An Empire of the East: Travels in Indonesia

Open Road Media
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From Sumatra to East Timor and beyond, An Empire of the East is a fascinating look at a rapidly changing island nation

In An Empire of the East, renowned travel essayist Norman Lewis takes readers to Indonesia, where some thirteen thousand islands in the South Pacific are each colored with their own unique cultures and histories. With more than three hundred ethnic groups speaking two hundred fifty languages, the warmth and generosity of the island people is matched only by the country’s complicated political and social landscape. Lewis’s account tells of a country whose remarkable cultures—as well as its flora and fauna—are increasingly shaped by the waves of modernity and global tourism.
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About the author

Norman Lewis (1908–2003) was one of the greatest English-language travel writers. He was the author of thirteen novels and fourteen works of nonfiction, including Naples ’44, The Tomb in Seville, and Voices of the Old Sea. Lewis served in the Allied occupation of Italy during World War II, and reported from Mafia-ruled Sicily and Vietnam under French-colonial rule, among other locations. Born in England, he traveled extensively, living in places including London, Wales, Nicaragua, a Spanish fishing village, and the countryside near Rome. 
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jul 30, 2013
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Pages
289
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ISBN
9781480433304
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Language
English
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Genres
Travel / Asia / Southeast
Travel / Essays & Travelogues
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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