Babe: The Legend Comes to Life

Open Road Media
16
Free sample

The definitive life story of the legendary Yankee slugger: “The best biography ever written about an American sports figure” (Sports Illustrated).
 Nearly a century has passed since George Herman Ruth made his major league debut, and in that time millions of words have been used to describe baseball’s greatest hero. But for a man like the Babe, for whom the phrase “larger than life” seems to have been coined, those millions of words have created a mythologized legacy. Who was the real Babe Ruth? Relying on exhaustive research and interviews with teammates, family members, and friends, historian Robert W. Creamer separates fact from fiction and paints an honest and fascinating portrait of the slugger. This is the definitive biography of a man who was, in legend and in truth, the best who ever lived.
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About the author

Robert W. Creamer (1922–2012) was one of the most distinguished American sportswriters of the last half-century. When Sports Illustrated was founded in 1954, Creamer was one of the first writers added to its masthead. In the late ’60s he began work on a definitive biography of Babe Ruth, whom Creamer had seen as a boy in the stands at Yankee Stadium, when the great player was in his decline. After five years’ work he released Babe, which is still called one of the greatest American sports biographies of all time. In 1984 he published a biography of Casey Stengel, the only man to have worn the uniforms of all four New York ball clubs. Despite retiring in 1984, Creamer continued to write for Sports Illustrated and provide commentary for historical sports documentaries. 
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jun 28, 2011
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Pages
438
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ISBN
9781453220658
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Sports
Sports & Recreation / Baseball / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The return of a sports classic with a new foreword by the author

Finally back in print after many years, here is Bill Lee’s classic tale of his renegade life on and off the mound. Whether walking out on the Montreal Expos to protest the release of a valued teammate or telling sportswriters eager for candid and offbeat comments more about the game than his bosses wanted anyone to know, pitcher Bill “Spaceman” Lee became celebrated as much for his rebellious personality as for his remarkable talent. Add to the mix his affinity for Eastern religions and controversial causes, and you can see why Lee infuriated the establishment while entertaining his legion of fans.

In this wildly funny memoir that became a massive bestseller in the United States and Canada when it was first published, Lee recounts the colorful story of his life—from the drugged-out antics of his college days at USC (where he learned that “marijuana never hammered me like a good Camel”) to his post–World Series travels with a group of liberal long-distance runners through Red China (where he discovered that conservatives don’t like marathons because “it’s much easier to climb into a Rolls-Royce”). Lee also describes his minor league days, joining the Reserves during the Vietnam War, his time with the Red Sox, and the 1975 World Series. He spares no detail while recalling his infamous falling-out with Red Sox management that led to his trade to Montreal.

Full of irreverent wit, and an inherent love of the game, The Wrong Stuff is a sports classic for a new generation.
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