One Nation Under God: A Factual History of America's Religious Heritage

Morgan James Publishing
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Free sample

An account of the spiritual direction of our country from the time the Puritans landed in the new world up to today.
 
Exploring our loss of faith in God and how that loss has impacted our society, this book includes quotes from some of the people who had the most influence on the growth of our once great nation and some of the people and events that have caused our nation to decline economically, socially, and morally. One Nation Under God includes many landmark court cases that have affected the way the American people can worship the Lord in public and in private. One Nation Under God is a map of our rise to greatness and our decline to the potential oblivion of this onetime light on the hill for all the world to follow. It also is a guide on how to reclaim our greatness by turning back to God for His forgiveness and guidance. The farther away we move from God the worse our society becomes. One Nation Under God sets out to prove to the country—possibly the world—that we are a Christian nation.
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About the author

Leon Stevens has a passion for the history of America and its founding. He is a patriot and is veryconcerned about the direction our country is heading. He believes we were founded onJudeo-Christian principles. He believes the direction of our country for the last forty-fiveyears has taken away the very foundation that our country was built upon. Born andraised in Sacramento, California, he served four years in the United States Air Force. Leon is an accountant currently working in Las Vegas, Nevada. He has been married for thirty-five years and has three children and four grandchildren. As a lay minister at SouthernHills Baptist Church in Las Vegas, Nevada, he preaches the Gospel at an assisted living home and also at a memory care facility. Leon runs the "Senior Care Ministry for Southern Hills.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Morgan James Publishing
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Published on
Oct 1, 2013
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781614488101
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Asia / Central Asia
History / United States / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The first complete history of Central Eurasia from ancient times to the present day, Empires of the Silk Road represents a fundamental rethinking of the origins, history, and significance of this major world region. Christopher Beckwith describes the rise and fall of the great Central Eurasian empires, including those of the Scythians, Attila the Hun, the Turks and Tibetans, and Genghis Khan and the Mongols. In addition, he explains why the heartland of Central Eurasia led the world economically, scientifically, and artistically for many centuries despite invasions by Persians, Greeks, Arabs, Chinese, and others. In retelling the story of the Old World from the perspective of Central Eurasia, Beckwith provides a new understanding of the internal and external dynamics of the Central Eurasian states and shows how their people repeatedly revolutionized Eurasian civilization.

Beckwith recounts the Indo-Europeans' migration out of Central Eurasia, their mixture with local peoples, and the resulting development of the Graeco-Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese civilizations; he details the basis for the thriving economy of premodern Central Eurasia, the economy's disintegration following the region's partition by the Chinese and Russians in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the damaging of Central Eurasian culture by Modernism; and he discusses the significance for world history of the partial reemergence of Central Eurasian nations after the collapse of the Soviet Union.



Empires of the Silk Road places Central Eurasia within a world historical framework and demonstrates why the region is central to understanding the history of civilization.

Within the common destiny is the individual destiny. So it is that through the telling of one Chinese peasant woman's life, a vivid vision of Chinese history and culture is illuminated. Over the course of two years, Ida Pruitt—a bicultural social worker, writer, and contributor to Sino-American understanding—visited with Ning Lao T'ai-ta'i, three times a week for breakfast. These meetings, originally intended to elucidate for Pruitt traditional Chinese family customs of which Lao T'ai-t'ai possessed some insight, became the foundation for an enduring friendship.

As Lao T'ai-t'ai described the cultural customs of her family, and of the broader community of which they were a part, she invoked episodes from her own personal history to illustrate these customs, until eventually the whole of her life lay open before her new confidante. Pruitt documented this story, casting light not only onto Lao T'ai-t'ai's own biography, but onto the character of life for the common man of China, writ large. The final product is a portrayal of China that is “vividly and humanly revealed.”

“This is surely the warmest, most human document that has ever come out of China....The report of her life and labors has the lasting symbolic quality of literature.”—The American Journal of Sociology

“No recent book has better portrayed the common man in China....This short autobiography is right in description of Chinese Social customs....In writing this book, Ida Pruitt has rendered a great service to the Chinese people...She has written a personal story through which the spirit of the common people of China is vividly and humanly revealed.”—Pacific Affairs

“This book opens a window into the Chinese world. Although the story is of one Chinese woman, the events of her life reach out into the experiences of many other people. They are a part of that wider social and imaginary world from which the Chinese draw meaning to their life.”—The Far Eastern Quarterly
In the seventh century the kingdom of Samarkand sent formal gifts of fancy yellow peaches, large as goose eggs and with a color like gold, to the Chinese court at Ch’ang-an. What kind of fruit these golden peaches really were cannot now be guessed, but they have the glamour of mystery, and they symbolize all the exotic things longed for, and unknown things hoped for, by the people of the T’ang empire.

This book examines the exotics imported into China during the T’ang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907), and depicts their influence on Chinese life. Into the land during the three centuries of T’ang came the natives of almost every nation of Asia, all bringing exotic wares either as gifts or as goods to be sold. Ivory, rare woods, drugs, diamonds, magicians, dancing girls—the author covers all classes of unusual imports, their places of origin, their lore, their effect on costume, dwellings, diet, and on painting, sculpture, music, and poetry.

This book is not a statistical record of commercial imports and medieval trade, but rather a “humanistic essay, however material its subject matter.”

“The most essential thing the reviewer can say about this book is, ‘Read it!’ It is probably the most informative, most scholarly, and most delightfully written book on China that has appeared in our time. It is a heartening reminder that scholars still have an interest in studying history in terms of people, in examining people’s intimate reactions to the little human things that occupied their daily lives.”—Jour. of Asian Studies

“A pure delight....Scarcely any aspect of T’ang life is omitted, so that bit by bit Mr. Schafer builds up a reasonably complete picture of an entire civilization. Mr· Schafer writes with urbanity and wit.”—Sat. Rev.

“A fascinating survey of T’ang culture as reflected in the use and demand for exotica....Rarely has the reviewer come upon a book so enjoyable and informative·”—Jour. of the American Oriental Society.
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