Lady Audley's Secret

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A barrister becomes a detective when his friend disappears at an English manor in this classic Victorian novel.

Beautiful Lucy Graham charms every man she meets, including wealthy widower Sir Michael Audley. After they marry, he refurbishes his mansion to create a little palace for his new wife, where her future seems bright. Her past, however, is shrouded in darkness, and she’ll do whatever it takes to keep it hidden.
 
Then Sir Michael’s nephew, Robert, a London barrister, comes for a visit with his good friend George Talboys for a week of fishing. But when George mysteriously vanishes, there’s no time to relax. Increasingly suspicious of his new aunt, Robert searches for clues, determined to find his friend and discover exactly who Lady Audley really is.
 
One of the most popular examples of the “sensation novel” craze that swept England during the nineteenth century, Lady Audley’s Secret is said to reflect themes from a real-life crime of the era, the notorious Constance Kent case.
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About the author

Mary Elizabeth Braddon (1835–1915) was a Victorian English author best known for her sensation novels. She was rather prolific, having written more than eighty novels in her lifetime. In 1862, Braddon published Lady Audley’s Secret, a rousing success that earned her a fortune. She also founded Belgravia magazine, which serialized sensation novels, biographies, poems, and essays; and wrote supernatural fiction, such as Gerald: Or, The World, the Flesh and the Devil. Braddon’s works have endured through the years and been adapted into films and television shows.
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3.8
42 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jun 6, 2017
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Pages
299
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ISBN
9781504045773
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Biographical
Fiction / Classics
Fiction / Romance / Historical / Victorian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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This carefully crafted ebook: "The Small House at Allington" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Small House at Allington is the fifth novel in Anthony Trollope's series known as the "Chronicles of Barsetshire". It enjoyed a revival in popularity in the early 1990s when the British prime minister, John Major, declared it as his favourite book. The Small House at Allington concerns the Dale family, who live in the "Small House", a dower house intended for the widowed mother (Dowager) of the owner of the estate. The landowner, in this instance, is the bachelor Squire of Allington, Christopher Dale. Dale's mother having died, he has allocated the Small House, rent free, to his widowed sister-in-law and her daughters Isabella ("Bell") and Lilian ("Lily"). Lily has for a long time been secretly loved by John Eames, a junior clerk at the Income Tax Office, while Bell is in love with the local doctor, James Crofts. The handsome and personable, somewhat mercenary Adolphus Crosbie is introduced into the circle by the squire's nephew, Bernard Dale… Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. Some of his best-loved works, collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, revolve around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote perceptive novels on political, social, and gender issues, and on other topical matters. Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he regained the esteem of critics by the mid-twentieth century.
This is a highly sensational story, full of clever, sprightly, and powerful writing, although calculated to make us believe that modern society is sadly in need of moral improvement. Miss Braddon writes with great fluency and case, and appears to have a natural aptitude for plotting. In abandoning the stage and music - teaching for this department of literature, we do not think she has mistaken her vocation. The first chapter of 'Aurora Floyd' is a story in itself. It tells the history of Mr. Archibald Floyd who came from 'the land o' cakes,' and worked his way up in the world till he became the senior partner of the great banking firm of Floyd, Floyd and Floyd, Lombard Street. It pictures him at his country residence, a bachelor past the prime of life, desolate and wealthy. 'It follows him to the theatre of Lancashiretown, where he falls in love with an actress — Miss Eliza Prodder by name — and marries her immediately; her theatrical acquaintances assuring her, in language more sincere than elegant, that she would be a great fool to refuse an old fellow like him, with lots of money — for they had acquired an idea of his wealth by his treating them in an adjoining tavern. There is nothing very attractive about her but her bright, black eyes; she is a mystery to the ladies who meet her at her new home, and they speak evil and are jealous of her; she is amazed at the grandeur of her new position; but earthly glory is short - lived, she dies, leaving behind a helpless babe and an inconsolable husband ...
The first and greatest sensation novel, a thrilling story of evil thwarted and love reclaimed

The night before he leaves London for a temporary engagement in the North of England, drawing instructor Walter Hartright walks home on an empty, moonlit road. Suddenly a hand reaches out of the darkness and touches him on the shoulder. Terrified, he turns to find a woman, dressed all in white, who begs him for help in getting to a friend’s place in the city. By a strange coincidence, the woman knows Limmeridge House, the country estate to which Walter is traveling in the morning. Stranger still, she refuses to reveal anything else about herself, including her name. Only after he sees her safely into a cab does Walter learn the truth—the woman in white has just escaped from an insane asylum.

In Limmeridge, Walter falls in love with one of his students, the beautiful and virtuous Laura Fairlie. An orphan in the care of her invalid uncle, Laura is engaged to Sir Percival Glyde, a baronet. She follows through with the marriage despite her feelings for Walter, but soon realizes her mistake. Sir Percival will stop at nothing to gain complete control of Laura’s inheritance, and his diabolical plot hinges on her astonishing resemblance to the mysterious woman in white. It is up to Walter and Marian, Laura’s devoted half-sister, to rescue fair Laura from a fate worse than death.

With its shocking twists and spine-chilling suspense, The Woman in White charted a whole new course for popular fiction. Devilishly entertaining and deadly serious in its indictment of Victorian marriage laws that impoverished women, it is widely recognized as one the nineteenth century’s finest novels.

This ebook features a new introduction by Otto Penzler and has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
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