Soccer Dad: A Father, a Son, and a Magic Season

Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
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From a writer with “a sharp, fresh eye,” comes his reflection on parenting, empty-nest syndrome, and the joy of watching a son reach his goals (The New York Times).
 
When Matt enters his senior year of high school, his father can’t help but feel some mixed emotions. What is his role in shaping his son’s future? What will life be like when Matt is away at college? And what about soccer? Matt’s success on the soccer team is a cause for celebration—but is it just setting him up for disappointment later in life?
 
In this candid memoir, W. D. Wetherell—a devoted dad, a diehard soccer fan, and a prize-winning author—follows his son’s team from field to field and win to win, and ruminates on topics ranging from the sport’s esoteric appeal in America to the conflicting feelings of a parent sending his youngest child out into the world. Reflecting on his own experiences both as a participant and a spectator, Wetherell offers a thoughtful tribute to both the game of soccer and the rewards of fatherhood.
 
“He details the season’s ups and downs, while describing the culture surrounding competitive youth soccer and saying good-bye to his son’s childhood. Wetherell writes with energy and light humor . . . Astute observations on soccer and the accompanying lifestyle.” —Publishers Weekly
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About the author

W. D. Wetherell has written numerous books, including Vermont River and The Wisest Man in America. The American Academy of Arts and Letters awarded him the prestigious Strauss Living Award in 1998. He lives in Lyme, New Hampshire.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
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Published on
Sep 17, 2008
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Pages
288
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ISBN
9781628731224
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The iconic college football coaches of the twentieth century emerged after World War II, bringing with them a military bearing and a love of war without casualties. Coach Darrell Royals life reads like a Shakespearean tragedy, replete with victory, defeat, betrayal and sorrow. Bear Bryant of Alabama, Bud Wilkinson of Oklahoma and Darrell Royal of Texas. What they accomplished over their lifetimes as coaches could not have happened anywhere in the United States except the post-war South.

From the advent of television in the mid-1950s through the desegregation of universities and athletic programs following the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Coach Royal led the conflicted life of a warrior, a father and a servant to the rich and powerful. Forbes Magazine has stated the UT-Austin athletic program is the most valuable in the country, worth an estimated 180 million dollars. The UT financial statement doesnt reveal how big money and political power overshadow the games and the young athletes who play them.

In the beginning, there was sorrow and loneliness. Darrell Royals mother, Katy, died three months after he was born, in 1924, leaving him in the hands of an inattentive father of six children and a veritable string of evil stepmothers. Darrell found his father figure and mentor in Bud Wilkinson, the courtly head coach of the mighty Oklahoma Sooners. In Norman, Darrell emulated Bud and for the first time, knew glory as an All-American player with a fiercely competitive spirit.

By the early 1960s, Royals job-hopping had landed him in Austin where the possibilities of gridiron glories remained unrealized. Royal was a perfect fit to change that. Television was bringing college football into the homes of Americans nationwide. Bryant, Wilkinson and Royal had an advantage. Each was telegenic, articulate and charismatic. The celebrity football coaches were earning their places in history by winning games but also by evolving into actors on a national stage.

The fall of 1963 changed the lives of all Americans. Royals Longhorns, ranked number two in the Associated Press, defeated Oklahoma, ranked number one, and went on to an undefeated season and Texas first ever national championship. Scarcely a month later, also in Dallas, President Kennedy was assassinated. His successor was a Texan Lyndon Baines Johnson. Royals life was going to be influenced in ways he could scarcely imagine and certainly couldnt control.

Texas has always been a provocative political environment. A Texas politician has to yell long and loud to get noticed in the vastness of the State. Since winners migrate to other winners, post-1963, Darrell and Edith Royal were on everyones A list for political and social events. The oligarchs who called the shots at UT also made it clear to Coach Royal. They didnt want any coloreds on their football team. While Royal coached the 1969 Longhorns to another national championship, the team regrettably was dubbed, the last lily white national championship team. Eventually, the tightrope Royal was being forced to walk began to wobble uncontrollably. It was the spring of 1974 before Royal finally landed a black student-athlete to whom he could point with pride. The young man was Earl Campbell, the Tyler Rose.

Bryant, Wilkinson and Royal are gone now. There are statues and street names and even campus stadiums named after them. The game they knew and coached is gone as well. As a result, we are left with the historical perspective they gave us, punctuated by the agonizing undercurrents that changed the game and changed a nation.

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States
 
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.
 
In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.
Growing up in the sixties was bad enough, but to grow up in the sixties as an inter-racial kid
was really bad. Th e blacks, who were already being openly hated for being black, didnt accept me
because I was half white and the whites didnt accept me because I was black. No one seemed
to accept me except a few from either side; and this was inside my own family. I didnt meet my
mothers father until I was fourteen. I was being prepared for the real world that was all too ready
to jump right in line and pick up where my family left off or may have missed a lesson or two.
Why did these and more, much more happen to me?
Because if youre going through hell right now or been through it; been abused; thinking of
hurting yourself or someone else; thinking of suicide; thinking no one loves you or ever could;
thinking no one cares; this is why I went through what you have to read in this book to believe.
It was for you.
Blessed be GOD, even the Father of our Lord JESUS CHRIST, the Father of mercies, and the
GOD of all comfort;
Who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any
trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of GOD.
For as the suff erings of CHRIST abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by CHRIST.
And whether we be affl icted, it is for your consolation and salvation, which is eff ectual in the
enduring of the same suff erings which we also suff er: or whether we be comforted, it is for your
consolation and salvation. 2 Corinthians 1:3-6 KJV.
Th erefore being justifi ed by faith, we have peace with GOD through our Lord JESUS CHRIST:
By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of
the glory of GOD.
And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience:
And patience, experience; and experience, hope:
And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of GOD is shed abroad in our hearts by the
Holy Ghost which is given unto us.
For when we were yet without strength, in due time CHRIST died for the ungodly.
For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even
dare to die.
But GOD commendeth His love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, CHRIST died
for us. Romans 5: 1-8 KJV.
And the grace of our Lord was exceeding abundant with faith and love which is in CHRIST JESUS.
Th is is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that CHRIST JESUS came into the world
to save sinners; of whom I am chief.
Howbeit for this cause I obtained mercy, that in me fi rst JESUS CHRIST might show forth all longsuff
ering, for a pattern to them which should hereafter believe on Him to life everlasting.
Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, be honor and glory for ever
and ever. Amen. 1 Timothy 1: 14-17 KJV.
Can We Help Us? T I M O T H Y S H E P H A R D
#1 NEW YORK TIMES, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND BOSTON GLOBE BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW • ONE OF PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR • BILL GATES’S HOLIDAY READING LIST • FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE’S AWARD IN AUTOBIOGRAPHY • FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE’S JOHN LEONARD PRIZE FOR BEST FIRST BOOK • FINALIST FOR THE PEN/JEAN STEIN BOOK AWARD 

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • O: The Oprah Magazine • Time • NPR • Good Morning America • San Francisco Chronicle • The Guardian • The Economist • Financial Times • Newsday • New York Post • theSkimm • Refinery29 • Bloomberg • Self • Real Simple • Town & Country • Bustle • Paste • Publishers Weekly • Library Journal • LibraryReads • BookRiot • Pamela Paul, KQED • New York Public Library

An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University

Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

“Beautiful and propulsive . . . Despite the singularity of [Tara Westover’s] childhood, the questions her book poses are universal: How much of ourselves should we give to those we love? And how much must we betray them to grow up?”—Vogue

“Westover has somehow managed not only to capture her unsurpassably exceptional upbringing, but to make her current situation seem not so exceptional at all, and resonant for many others.”—The New York Times Book Review
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