Sugarcane Academy: How a New Orleans Teacher and His Storm-Struck Students Created a School to Remember

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This inspiring story of a post-Katrina classroom “reminds us all that heroes hold small hands on field trips, clean paint brushes, and sing morning songs” (Phillip Done, author of 32 Third Graders and One Class Bunny: Life Lessons from Teaching).
 
As floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina surged at their heels, those fleeing New Orleans had their minds more on safety than on whether their children would be missing school. But when a group of evacuee parents who settled in New Iberia, Louisiana, realized they would not be returning home quickly, they set about reconstructing their families’ lives. And so they turned to beloved New Orleans schoolteacher Paul Reynaud, whose fierce determination and unwavering spirit transformed an abandoned office into a one-room schoolhouse. This is the story of Sugarcane Academy: twenty-five students, their devoted parents, an inspiring teacher, and the boundless power of learning.
 
“This wonderful memoir manages to do what a flood of news-reporting could not: see the tragedy of Katrina through the eyes of children. The story of the Sugarcane Academy, an improvised one-room school in a sugarcane parish in south Louisiana, will be one of the lasting books of our tragedy.” —Andrei Codrescu, author of New Orleans, Mon Amour: Twenty Years of Writings from the City
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About the author

Michael Tisserand is the author of The Kingdom of Zydeco, which won the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for music writing. He served as editor of Gambit Weekly, the alternative newsweekly of New Orleans. He lives in Evanston, Illinois.
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Additional Information

Publisher
HMH
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Published on
Jul 2, 2007
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9780547350714
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / General
Education / Inclusive Education
Social Science / Disasters & Disaster Relief
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Understanding and Teaching Grammar in the Primary Classroom is a practical guide for trainee and practising teachers, with language, and the way we use it to think and communicate, at its heart. Built on a foundation of how powerful, beautiful and thought-provoking language is, this book uses our intuitions about words and language to form a picture of how grammar works, and how even very young children are masters of its patterns.

Each chapter builds from fundamental concepts up to the fine details, providing an introduction to developing grammatical subject knowledge, alongside explanations of key ideas and vocabulary, including:

• Generality – a look at the general structures of sentences that allow us to learn a language at all

• Specifics – a look at the words and modifications that allow us to use this universal tool to pinpoint the specifics of our thoughts and the world around us

• Relationships – looking at how sentences behave in relation to one another, and how they can be merged in such a way that we can show cause and effect in the world

• Humans – focusing on some of the details and idiosyncrasies we are able to give our language

• Language games – examples of language typical of children, and methods to pull this apart and understand how it works.

At its core is the idea that as our language grows, so our understanding grows; grammar is not the study of what to say and how to say it, but of what it is possible to think, feel and express in words.

Illustrated throughout with practical lesson ideas, helpful tips and easy-to-use classroom strategies, Understanding and Teaching Grammar in the Primary Classroom is a must-read guide for all trainee and practising primary teachers.

As the world comes to grips with what it means to be literate in the twenty-first century, Understanding and Supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8 provides practitioners with the skills and knowledge they need to support young children effectively as they learn to write. Interweaving theory and research with everyday practice, the book offers guidance on all aspects of writing, from creating multimodal texts and building children’s vocabulary, to providing support for children who find writing particularly challenging.

With appropriate strategies to develop young children’s writing from an early age included throughout, the book discusses the role of oral language in early writing in detail and explores the key relationships between ‘drawing and talking’, ‘drawing and writing’ and ‘drawing, talking and writing’. Each chapter also features samples of writing and drawing to illustrate key points, as well as reflective questions to help the reader apply ideas in their own settings. Further topics covered include:

progressions in children’s writing

writing in the pre-school years

developing authorial skills

developing editorial skills

teaching writing to EAL learners.

Understanding and Supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8

is a unique resource that will help early childhood educators, early years school teachers, specialist practitioners working with very young children, and students enrolled in Early Childhood or Primary Studies courses to boost their confidence in teaching young learners as they become writers.
How would you go about rebuilding a technological society from scratch?

If our technological society collapsed tomorrow what would be the one book you would want to press into the hands of the postapocalyptic survivors? What crucial knowledge would they need to survive in the immediate aftermath and to rebuild civilization as quickly as possible?

Human knowledge is collective, distributed across the population. It has built on itself for centuries, becoming vast and increasingly specialized. Most of us are ignorant about the fundamental principles of the civilization that supports us, happily utilizing the latest—or even the most basic—technology without having the slightest idea of why it works or how it came to be. If you had to go back to absolute basics, like some sort of postcataclysmic Robinson Crusoe, would you know how to re-create an internal combustion engine, put together a microscope, get metals out of rock, or even how to produce food for yourself?


Lewis Dartnell proposes that the key to preserving civilization in an apocalyptic scenario is to provide a quickstart guide, adapted to cataclysmic circumstances. The Knowledge describes many of the modern technologies we employ, but first it explains the fundamentals upon which they are built. Every piece of technology rests on an enormous support network of other technologies, all interlinked and mutually dependent. You can’t hope to build a radio, for example, without understanding how to acquire the raw materials it requires, as well as generate the electricity needed to run it. But Dartnell doesn’t just provide specific information for starting over; he also reveals the greatest invention of them all—the phenomenal knowledge-generating machine that is the scientific method itself. 


The Knowledge is a brilliantly original guide to the fundamentals of science and how it built our modern world.

In the tradition of Schulz and Peanuts, an epic and revelatory biography of Krazy Kat creator George Herriman that explores the turbulent time and place from which he emerged—and the deep secret he explored through his art.

The creator of the greatest comic strip in history finally gets his due—in an eye-opening biography that lays bare the truth about his art, his heritage, and his life on America’s color line. A native of nineteenth-century New Orleans, George Herriman came of age as an illustrator, journalist, and cartoonist in the boomtown of Los Angeles and the wild metropolis of New York. Appearing in the biggest newspapers of the early twentieth century—including those owned by William Randolph Hearst—Herriman’s Krazy Kat cartoons quickly propelled him to fame. Although fitfully popular with readers of the period, his work has been widely credited with elevating cartoons from daily amusements to anarchic art.

Herriman used his work to explore the human condition, creating a modernist fantasia that was inspired by the landscapes he discovered in his travels—from chaotic urban life to the Beckett-like desert vistas of the Southwest. Yet underlying his own life—and often emerging from the contours of his very public art—was a very private secret: known as "the Greek" for his swarthy complexion and curly hair, Herriman was actually African American, born to a prominent Creole family that hid its racial identity in the dangerous days of Reconstruction.

Drawing on exhaustive original research into Herriman’s family history, interviews with surviving friends and family, and deep analysis of the artist’s work and surviving written records, Michael Tisserand brings this little-understood figure to vivid life, paying homage to a visionary artist who helped shape modern culture.

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