Criminal Children: Researching Juvenile Offenders, 1820–1920

Grub Street Publishers
Free sample

A history of juvenile crime, punishment, and reform in England in the years before, during, and after the era of Charles Dickens.
 
How were juvenile delinquents dealt with in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries? What dire circumstances led to their behavior? Were the efforts to curb their criminal tendencies successful? From 1820–1920, ideas about youth and transgression changed dramatically in the United Kingdom. Criminal Children delves into this period to uncover fascinating insight into the neglected subject of childhood crime and punishment, and the “invention” of juvenile delinquency.
 
Drawing on the life stories of twenty-four “bad seeds,” true crime journalists Emma Watkins and Barry Godfrey explore every aspect of these young and desperate lives: their experiences in prisons, reformatory schools, industrial schools, borstals, and female factories; their trials and criminal petitions; and the harrowing transport to Australia—considered the last resort for adult convicts and children alike.
 
Including resources for researching one’s own criminal forebears, Criminal Children is “an interesting book to anybody who wants to know more about juvenile offenders in England” (Nell Darby, author of Life on the Victorian Stage).
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About the author

Professor Barry Godfrey is Professor of Social Justice at the University of Liverpool and Honorary Professor of Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University, China. Among his many publications are _Crime, Wartime and Control: Protecting the Population of a Blitzed City, 1939-1945_ (with P. Adey and David Cox), _Victorian Convicts: 100 Criminal Lives_ (with Helen Johnston and David Cox) and _Crime and Justice Since 1750_ (with Paul Lawrence).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Grub Street Publishers
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Published on
Oct 30, 2018
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9781526738097
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Language
English
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Genres
True Crime / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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You think the teenagers of today have it good? That their struggles are merely First World pains? Or only kids from broken families go bad?

Think again. Negative influences are lurking at every corner and money can buy anything. For everything else, there is the Internet. Want friends? Join an online cult. Want drugs? Click and DIY. Want to forge? Learn how with web videos. Want porn? Upload your own. When such disturbing influences combine with an oppressive pressure to fit in, some teens stick to the straight path society has laid out, while others stray into dark alleys, only to be trapped, committing crimes or developing psychological problems that ruin them, leaving their futures in shambles.

Through interviews, experience, and research, the authors expose stories of seemingly normal teens from average Singaporean families. Hear their voices and understand their mindsets. After all, beneath the rosy-cheeked exterior of that sweet child across the road lurks a possible future social psychopath

Author Dr Kaiwen Leong is an economist, entrepreneur, lecturer and academic researcher. A graduate of Princeton University, he is currently an Assistant Professor of Economics at Nanyang Technological University. He is also an Associate Faculty Member at the Singapore Institute of Management, and consults for many private sector organisations, including Singapore Business Federation and Oxford Economics. His autobiography Singapore’s Lost Son: How I Made It From Dropout to Princeton PhD was published in 2012.
Winner of the NBCC Award for General Nonfiction

Named on Amazon's Best Books of the Year 2015--Michael Botticelli, U.S. Drug Czar (Politico) Favorite Book of the Year--Angus Deaton, Nobel Prize Economics (Bloomberg/WSJ) Best Books of 2015--Matt Bevin, Governor of Kentucky (WSJ) Books of the Year--Slate.com's 10 Best Books of 2015--Entertainment Weekly's 10 Best Books of 2015 --Buzzfeed's 19 Best Nonfiction Books of 2015--The Daily Beast's Best Big Idea Books of 2015--Seattle Times' Best Books of 2015--Boston Globe's Best Books of 2015--St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Best Books of 2015--The Guardian's The Best Book We Read All Year--Audible's Best Books of 2015--Texas Observer's Five Books We Loved in 2015--Chicago Public Library's Best Nonfiction Books of 2015

From a small town in Mexico to the boardrooms of Big Pharma to main streets nationwide, an explosive and shocking account of addiction in the heartland of America.

In 1929, in the blue-collar city of Portsmouth, Ohio, a company built a swimming pool the size of a football field; named Dreamland, it became the vital center of the community. Now, addiction has devastated Portsmouth, as it has hundreds of small rural towns and suburbs across America--addiction like no other the country has ever faced. How that happened is the riveting story of Dreamland.

With a great reporter's narrative skill and the storytelling ability of a novelist, acclaimed journalist Sam Quinones weaves together two classic tales of capitalism run amok whose unintentional collision has been catastrophic. The unfettered prescribing of pain medications during the 1990s reached its peak in Purdue Pharma's campaign to market OxyContin, its new, expensive--extremely addictive--miracle painkiller. Meanwhile, a massive influx of black tar heroin--cheap, potent, and originating from one small county on Mexico's west coast, independent of any drug cartel--assaulted small town and mid-sized cities across the country, driven by a brilliant, almost unbeatable marketing and distribution system. Together these phenomena continue to lay waste to communities from Tennessee to Oregon, Indiana to New Mexico.

Introducing a memorable cast of characters--pharma pioneers, young Mexican entrepreneurs, narcotics investigators, survivors, and parents--Quinones shows how these tales fit together. Dreamland is a revelatory account of the corrosive threat facing America and its heartland.
“The fascinating lives of the women who hit hard times . . . investigat[es] the stories behind the faces in the incredible images.” —Al Bawaba
 
Women are among the hardest individuals to trace through the historical record and this is especially true of female offenders who had a vested interest in not wanting to be found. That is why this thought-provoking and accessible handbook by Lucy Williams and Barry Godfrey is of such value. It looks beyond the crimes and the newspaper reports of women criminals in the Victorian era in order to reveal the reality of their personal and penal journeys, and it provides a guide for researchers who are keen to explore this intriguing and neglected subject.
 
The book is split into three sections. There is an introduction outlining the historical context for the study of female crime and punishment, then a series of real-life case studies which show in a vivid way the complexity of female offenders’ lives and follows them through the penal system. The third section is a detailed guide to archival and online sources that readers can consult in order to explore the life-histories of criminal women.
 
The result is a rare combination of academic guide and how-to-do-it manual. It introduces readers to the latest research in the field and it gives them all the information they need to carry out their own research.
 
“The core of the book consists of some 30 case studies of women who went through the system, their offences (from drunkenness and petty theft to murder) and their punishments (from fines or prison to transportation or execution).” —Police History Society
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