Were We Our Brothers' Keepers?: The Public Response of American Jews to the Holocaust, 1938–1944

Open Road Media
Free sample

In this major work exploring the American Jewish response to the Holocaust as it occurred, by examining contemporary Jewish press accounts of such events as Kristallnacht, the refusal to allow the refugee ship St. Louis to land in America, the uprising in the Warsaw ghetto, and the deportation of the Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz, Haskel Lookstein provides us with an important perspective on the way in which events are reported on, perceived, and interpreted in their own time.
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About the author

Rabbi Haskel Lookstein has a bachelor’s from Columbia College, a master’s in rabbinics, a doctorate in modern Jewish history from Bernard Revel Graduate School, and ordination from Rabbi Yitzchak Elchanan Theological Seminary. A past president of Yeshiva University Rabbinic Alumni, and professor of humanities at REITS, of Yeshiva University, Rabbi Lookstein has been deeply involved in issues of concern to the Jewish community. He was chairman of the Greater New York Coalition for Soviet Jews, president of the New York Board of Rabbis, President of the Synagogue Council of America, Chairman of the Rabbinic Cabinet of National UJA, and member of the board of the Joint Distribution Committee. Rabbi Lookstein’s works have appeared in Tradition, Sh’ma, Congress Monthly, Moment, HaDarom, and newspapers in the United States and Israel. Rabbi Lookstein and his wife Audrey have four children and twelve grandchildren.


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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jun 24, 2014
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Pages
280
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ISBN
9781497631182
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Holocaust
History / Jewish
Social Science / Jewish Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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