Jericho Mosaic

The Jerusalem Quartet

Book 4
Open Road Media
2
Free sample

The stunning conclusion to Edward Whittemore’s Jerusalem Quartet: The remarkable story of an Israeli agent who infiltrates Syrian intelligence, keying victory in the Six Day War
Yossi is an ideal agent for the Mossad—an Iraqi Jew, an idealist, and a charming loner, fluent in Arab dialects. Tajar, a brilliant agent, recruits and manages Yossi, code-named “the Runner.” Thus begins the longest-running and most successful operation in the history of Israeli intelligence. Yossi’s cover is Halim, a Syrian businessman who has returned home from Buenos Aires and whose charm inspires high-level friendships. His reputation leads to an opportunity that he can’t refuse: Tajar becomes a double agent infiltrating Syrian intelligence.
Meanwhile, in the desert oasis of Jericho, Abu Musa, an Arab patriarch, and Moses the Ethiopian, meet each day over games of shesh-besh and glasses of Arak to ponder history and humanity. We learn about the friendship of Yossi’s son, Assaf, an Israeli soldier badly wounded during the Six Day War, and Yousef, a young Arab teacher who, in support of the Palestinian cause, decides to live as an exile in the Judean wilderness.
Jericho Mosaic
is the final volume of the Jerusalem Quartet, which begins with Sinai Tapestry, Jerusalem Poker, and Nile Shadows. Steeped in the history and landscape of the Middle East, it is a story of idealism and dreams, hope and despair, and life’s moments of breathtaking beauty.
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About the author

Edward Whittemore (1933­­­–1995) graduated from Yale University in 1955 and went on to serve as a Marine officer in Japan and spend ten years as a CIA operative in the Far East, Europe, and the Middle East. In addition to writing fiction, he managed a newspaper in Greece, was employed by a shoe company in Italy, and worked in New York City’s narcotics control office during the administration of Mayor John V. Lindsay. He wrote the Jerusalem Quartet while dividing his time between New York and Jerusalem.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jul 23, 2013
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Pages
395
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ISBN
9781480433922
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Alternative History
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / Magical Realism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Longlisted for the 2019 International Dublin Literary Award

“Special Envoy is an exceedingly French spy thriller.”
—New York Times Book Review

A dazzling satirical spy novel, part La Femme Nikita, part Pink Panther and part Le Carré—from one of the world’s preeminent authors

Jean Echenoz’s sly and playful novels have won critical and popular acclaim in France, where he has won the Prix Goncourt, as well as in the United States, where he has been profiled by the New Yorker and called the“most distinctive voice of his generation” by the Washington Post. With his wonderfully droll and intriguing new work, Special Envoy, Echenoz turns his hand to the espionage novel. When published in France, it stormed the bestseller lists.

Special Envoy begins with an old general in France’s intelligence agency asking his trusted lieutenant Paul Objat for ideas about a person he wants for a particular job: someone to aid the destabilization of Kim Jong-un’s regime in North Korea. Objat has someone in mind: Constance, an attractive, restless, bored woman in a failing marriage to a washed-up pop musician. Soon after, she is abducted by Objat’s cronies and spirited away into the lower depths of France’s intelligence bureaucracy where she is trained for her mission.

What follows is a bizarre tale of kidnappings, murders and mutilations, bad pop songs and great sex, populated by a cast of oddballs and losers. Set in Paris, rural central France, and Pyongyang, Special Envoy is joyously strange and unpredictable, full of twists and ironic digressions—and, in the words of L’Express, “a pure gem, a delight.”

A special four-in-one edition of Edward Whittemore’s epic Jerusalem Quartet
In Sinai Tapestry, it is 1840, and Plantagenet Strongbow, the twenty-ninth duke of Dorset, seven-feet-seven-inches tall and the greatest swordsman and botanist of Victorian England, walks away from the family estate and disappears into the Sinai Desert carrying only a large magnifying glass and a portable sundial. He emerges forty years later as an Arab holy man and anthropologist, now the author of a massive study of Levantine sex—and the secret owner of the Ottoman Empire.
In Jerusalem Poker, on New Year’s Eve, 1921, three men sit down to a poker game. The Great Jerusalem Poker Game, as it’s eventually known, continues for the next twelve years. The players are as exotic as the game: Cairo Martyr, a one-time African slave, now the Middle East’s chief supplier of aphrodisiac mummy dust; Joe O’Sullivan Beare, an Irish tradesman with a specialty in sacred phallic amulets; and Munk Szondi, an Austro-Hungarian Imperial Army colonel turned dedicated Zionist. And they are playing for no less than the control of Jerusalem itself.
In Nile Shadows, in 1941, a hand grenade explodes in a Cairo bar, taking the life of Stern, a petty gunrunner and morphine addict. His death could easily go unnoticed as Rommel’s tanks charge through the desert in an attempt to open the Middle East to Hitler’s forces. Yet the mystery behind Stern’s death is a top priority for intelligence experts. Master spies from three countries converge on Joe O’Sullivan Beare, who is closer to Stern than anyone, in an effort to unravel the disturbing puzzle. The search for the truth about Stern leads O’Sullivan Beare through the slums of Cairo to a decaying former brothel called the Hotel Babylon.
And in Jericho Mosaic, Yossi is an ideal agent for the Mossad. He’s recruited by an agent named Tajar, and code-named “the Runner.” Thus begins the longest-running and most successful operation in the history of Israeli intelligence. Meanwhile, in the desert oasis of Jericho, Abu Musa, an Arab patriarch, and Moses the Ethiopian, meet each day over games of shesh-besh and glasses of Arak to ponder history and humanity. We learn about the friendship of Yossi’s son, Assaf, an Israeli soldier badly wounded during the Six Day War, and Yousef, a young Arab teacher who, in support of the Palestinian cause, decides to live as an exile in the Judean wilderness.
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