Imprisoned: Drawings from Nazi Concentration Camps

Skyhorse
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Free sample

“A visual testament to the horrors of Nazi cruelty . . . Produced by some of the artists who perished in concentration camps” (Kirkus Reviews).
 
In September 1979, at age fifty-six, writer and artist Arturo Benvenuti fueled up his motor home and set forth on what he knew would be an emotional journey. His plan—his own Viae Crucis—was to meet with as many former prisoners of Nazi-fascist concentration camps as he could. He wanted not only to learn their stories, but to learn from their stories.
 
He met with dozens of survivors from Auschwitz, Terezín, Mauthausen-Gusen, Buchenwald, Dachau, Gonars, Monigo, Renicci, Banjica, Ravensbrück, Jasenovac, Belsen, and Gurs. Many of these men and women shared their memories with Benvenuti along with artwork they’d created during their internment with pencil, ink, and charcoal.
 
After four decades of research, Benvenuti presents these original black-and-white pieces in Imprisoned. This stunning collection provides visuals that oftentimes even the most eloquent words and sentences cannot convey.
 
In his foreword, chemist, writer, and Holocaust survivor Primo Levi highlights the importance of these reproductions, stating, “some have the immediate power of art; all have the raw power of the eye that has seen and that transmits its indignation.”
 
“A book that even today remains truthful and intense, a challenging work created over the course of several years ‘free of empty words. Free of rhetoric.’” —Il Fatto Quotidiano
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About the author

Arturo Benvenuti was born in 1923 in the northeastern Italian province of Treviso. He is a poet, painter, art critic and scholar, combining his social and environmental commitment with the promotion of art and photography exhibits around the world. He resides in Oderzo, Italy.

Primo Levi was born in 1919. He was an Italian Jewish chemist and award-winning writer. In 1944, he was sent to Auschwitz, where he remained until liberation in 1945. He is best known for If This is a Man, published in 1947. He passed away in 1987.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Skyhorse
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Published on
Jan 17, 2017
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Pages
273
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ISBN
9781510706682
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Holocaust
History / Jewish
Social Science / Jewish Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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