The Ivory Carver Trilogy: Mother Earth Father Sky, My Sister the Moon, and Brother Wind

Open Road Media
17
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Now in one volume, the sweeping Native American trilogy set at the dawn of human civilization in Alaska, from an international-bestselling author.

Following the lives of three incredible Aleut women in prehistoric Alaska, the Ivory Carver Trilogy has been hailed as “more successful than Clan of the Cave Bear” by the Washington Post Book World and “moving and credible” by the New York Times Book Review. Now, experience all three insightful and touching novels in this one epic volume.
 
Mother Earth Father Sky: After her tribe is slaughtered, a young woman, Chagak, is left alone to care for her infant brother. With nothing left to lose, she sets out on a dangerous quest for survival—and revenge—among the icy waters, vicious enemies, and frozen tundra of Alaska.
 
My Sister the Moon: Kiin has been betrothed to the son of the tribal chief since birth, but her heart belongs to his brother. When she is suddenly taken from her people, hardships, love, and chance will change Kiin—and ultimately lead her to a new destiny.
 
Brother Wind: Finally content with her hard-won life, Kiin is devastated when she’s thrust back into the nightmares of her past. Across the land, Kukutux, the wife of a Whale Hunter, faces starvation and hostility when she finds herself widowed. As their paths converge, the two women must find the strength in their hearts to withstand the cruelties of man, nature, and fate.
 
Filled with impeccable research and extraordinary characters, the Ivory Carver Trilogy is an unforgettable, must-read saga of family, love, survival, and history.
  
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The complete saga of prehistoric Aleut tribal life in one volume: “Under Harrison’s hand, ancient Alaska comes beautifully alive” (The Denver Post).
 In Song of the River, eighty centuries ago, in the frozen land that is now Alaska, a clubfooted male child had been left to die, when a woman named K’os rescued him. Twenty years later and no longer a child, Chakliux occupies the revered role as his tribe’s storyteller. In the neighboring village of the Near River people, where Chakliux will attempt to make peace by wedding the shaman’s daughter, a double murder occurs that sends him on a harsh, enthralling journey in search of the truth about the tragic losses his people have suffered, and into the arms of a woman he was never meant to love.
In Cry of the Wind, Chakliux has one weakness: the beautiful Aqamdax, who has been promised to a cruel tribesman she does not love. But there can be no future for Chakliux and Aqamdax until a curse upon their peoples has been lifted. As they travel a dangerous path, they encounter greater challenges than the harsh terrain and the long season of ice. K’os, the woman who saved Chakliux’s life when he was an infant, is now enslaved by the leader of the enemy tribe against whom she has sworn vengeance. To carry out her justice she will destroy anyone who gets in her way, even the storyteller she raised as her own son.
And in Call Down the Stars, a handsome young tribal warrior and sage, Yikaas has traveled across the sea to hear stories of the Whale Hunter and the Sea Hunter peoples. Around the fire, Qumalix, a beguiling and beautiful storyteller, barely old enough to be a wife, catches the eye of Yikaas, and so begins their flirtation through storytelling, which brings to vivid life tales of the Near River and Cousin River tribes. The fates of lovers Chakliux and Aqamdax, and their wicked nemesis K’os, are revealed as Yikaas and Qumalix weave together tales from their ancestors’ past—and tales from their own lives. 
4.5
17 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Nov 18, 2013
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Pages
1256
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ISBN
9781480465855
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Cultural Heritage
Fiction / Historical / General
Fiction / Native American & Aboriginal
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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WINNER OF THE CENTER FOR FICTION FIRST NOVEL PRIZE

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NEW YORK TIMES BEST-SELLER 

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The complete saga of prehistoric Aleut tribal life in one volume: “Under Harrison’s hand, ancient Alaska comes beautifully alive” (The Denver Post).
 In Song of the River, eighty centuries ago, in the frozen land that is now Alaska, a clubfooted male child had been left to die, when a woman named K’os rescued him. Twenty years later and no longer a child, Chakliux occupies the revered role as his tribe’s storyteller. In the neighboring village of the Near River people, where Chakliux will attempt to make peace by wedding the shaman’s daughter, a double murder occurs that sends him on a harsh, enthralling journey in search of the truth about the tragic losses his people have suffered, and into the arms of a woman he was never meant to love.
In Cry of the Wind, Chakliux has one weakness: the beautiful Aqamdax, who has been promised to a cruel tribesman she does not love. But there can be no future for Chakliux and Aqamdax until a curse upon their peoples has been lifted. As they travel a dangerous path, they encounter greater challenges than the harsh terrain and the long season of ice. K’os, the woman who saved Chakliux’s life when he was an infant, is now enslaved by the leader of the enemy tribe against whom she has sworn vengeance. To carry out her justice she will destroy anyone who gets in her way, even the storyteller she raised as her own son.
And in Call Down the Stars, a handsome young tribal warrior and sage, Yikaas has traveled across the sea to hear stories of the Whale Hunter and the Sea Hunter peoples. Around the fire, Qumalix, a beguiling and beautiful storyteller, barely old enough to be a wife, catches the eye of Yikaas, and so begins their flirtation through storytelling, which brings to vivid life tales of the Near River and Cousin River tribes. The fates of lovers Chakliux and Aqamdax, and their wicked nemesis K’os, are revealed as Yikaas and Qumalix weave together tales from their ancestors’ past—and tales from their own lives. 
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