The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4

The Adrian Mole Series

Book 1
Open Road Media
23
Free sample

British adolescent angst has never been so “laugh-out-loud funny” as in this first encounter with a sharp-witted, pining, and achingly honest underdog (The New York Times).
 
Perhaps when I am famous and my diary is discovered, people will understand the torment of being a 13¾-year-old undiscovered intellectual.
 
Adrian Mole is approaching fourteen, and like all radical intellectuals he must amass his grievances: His acne vulgaris is grotesque; his crush, Pandora, received seventeen Valentine’s Day cards; his PE teacher is a sadist; he fears his parents’ marriage is over since they no longer smoke together; his dog has gone AWOL; no one appreciates his poetry; and Animal Farm has set him off pork for good. If everyone were as appalled as Adrian Mole, it would be a better world.
 
Introducing “one of literature’s most endearing figures”: a luckless adolescent of great expectations and dwindling patience who knows all—or believes he does—and tells all (The Observer). First published in 1982, Adrian’s chronicle of angst has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, spawned seven sequels, and been adapted for television and staged as a musical. Here’s where it all began.
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About the author

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester, England, in 1946. Despite not learning to read until the age of eight, leaving school at fifteen with no qualifications, and having three children by the time she was in her mid-twenties, she managed to be very well read. Townsend wrote secretly for twenty years, and after joining a writers’ group at the Phoenix Theatre, Leicester, she won a Thames Television Award for her first play, Womberang, and became a professional playwright and novelist. Following the publication of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾, she continued to make the nation laugh and prick its conscience with seven more volumes of Adrian’s diaries, five popular novels—including The Queen and I, Number Ten, and The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year—and numerous well-received plays. Townsend passed away in 2014 at the age of sixty-eight, and remains widely regarded as Britain’s favorite comic writer.
 
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4.0
23 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jan 2, 2018
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Pages
261
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ISBN
9781504048859
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Coming of Age
Fiction / Epistolary
Fiction / Humorous / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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As his secret diary extends into his later teen years, the angsty Brit remains “part Holden Caulfield, part . . . Bertie Wooster” and all Adrian (The New York Times).
 
Send my diaries back. I would hate them to fall into unfriendly, possibly commercial hands. I am afraid of blackmail; as you know my diaries are full of sex and scandal.
 
What’s happening to Adrian Mole? He’s on the cusp of adulthood and burgeoning success as a published poet. But . . . he still lives at home, refuses to part with his threadbare stuffed rabbit, and has lost his job at the library for a shocking act of impudence: He shelved Jane Austen under “light romance.” Even worse, someone named Sue Townsend stole his diaries and published them under her own name. Of course they were bestsellers.
 
The “brilliant comic creation” returns, sharing his poetry (award-winning!), travel journals (he’s going places), musings on lost love (more of an obsession), and some major news (he’s writing a novel!) (The Times). But not all the confessions are his alone. We also hear from that notorious pilferer Townsend, who, after receiving a suspended prison sentence, now lives in shame in a bleak moorland cottage. Don’t tell Adrian, but the New York Times Book Review still insists that it’s she who “is a national treasure.”
 
From “one of Britain’s most celebrated comic writers” (The Guardian) comes the inventive new novel in the “perceptive and funny” (The New York Times) series that has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, was adapted for television and staged as a musical, and is nothing less than “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post).

 
As his laugh-out-loud secret diary extends into his later teens and young adulthood, everyone’s favorite angsty Brit remains “a brilliant comic creation” (The Times, London).
 
Continue to commiserate with “one of literature’s most endearing figures”—a sharp-witted, pining, and achingly honest underdog of great expectations and dwindling patience who knows all (or believes he does) and tells all (The Observer). Having endured the agony of adolescence (just), Adrian now careens into his later teens, torturous twenties, and utterly disappointing thirties in these three hilarious sequels by “one of Britain’s most celebrated comic writers” (The Guardian).
 
From the not-so-humble origins of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 and ¾, Adrian’s chronicle of angst has sold more than twenty million copies worldwide, spawned seven sequels, been adapted for television, and staged as a musical—truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post).
 
The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole: What’s happening to Adrian Mole? On the one hand, he’s entering the cusp of adulthood and burgeoning success as a published poet. On the other, he still lives at home, refuses to part with his threadbare stuffed rabbit, and has lost his job at the library for a shocking act of impudence: He shelved Jane Austen under Light Romance. Even worse, someone named Sue Townsend stole his diaries and published them under her own name. Of course they were bestsellers.
 
Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years: At 23¾ years old, Adrian is now technically an adult and almost prepared. On the upside: He’s fallen for a perfectly lovely Nigerian waitress; he’s seeing a therapist so as to talk about himself without interruption; and he’s added vowels to his experimental novel-in-progress (so much more accessible to the masses!). The downside? Pandora is probably history; a pea-brained rival has been published before him to great acclaim; and worse—Adrian has come to the devastating realization that he may not be uncommon after all.
 
Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years: At 34¾, impotent intellectual Adrian Mole is soon to be divorced; he hasn’t a clue what to do with his semi-stardom as a celebrity chef; his parents have become swingers (with whom is too shocking to go into now); his epic novel is still unpublished; his ex-flame Pandora is running for political office; and his younger sister has rebelled in the most distressingly common ways. There is one upside: Adrian’s son has inherited his mother’s unblemished skin.
 
“Townsend’s wit is razor sharp” (Daily Mirror) as she shows us the world through the older and (possibly?) wiser eyes of her “achingly funny anti-hero” (Daily Mail), proving again and again why she’s been called “a national treasure” (The New York Times Book Review).
A rollicking comic adventure starring “one of literature’s most endearing figures” (The Observer).
 
Readers worldwide have loved Adrian Mole ever since he wrote his first diary at age thirteen and three quarters. Now he is age thirty-four and three quarters—not quite fully grown up, but getting there.
 
In this “funny and wrenching,” novel Adrian needs proof that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction so he can get a refund from a travel agency of the deposit he paid on a trip to Cyprus (Publishers Weekly). Naturally, he writes to Tony Blair for some evidence .
 
He’s engaged to the woman he loves, but obsessed with her voluptuous sister. And he is so deeply in debt to banks and credit card companies that it would take more than twice his monthly salary to ever repay them. He also needs a guest speaker for his creative writing group’s dinner in Leicestershire, and wonders if the prime minister’s wife is available.
 
In short, Adrian is back in true form, unable—like so many people we know, but of course, not us—to admit that the world does not revolve around him . . .
 
In Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction, international-bestselling author Sue Townsend combines “love, politics and credit-card debacle into a not-to-be-missed novel” (The Seattle Times).
 
“The trouble with trying to read passages from the Adrian Mole diaries aloud is that you find yourself laughing so hard you can’t go on.” —The Kansas City Star
 
“Townsend’s wickedly funny novels are another reason to be grateful for the right of free speech.” —San Francisco Chronicle
 
British adolescent angst has never been so “laugh-out-loud funny” (The New York Times)—the journey begins with these first two books in the heartbreakingly hilarious series.
 
Commiserate with “one of literature’s most endearing figures” (The Observer)—a sharp-witted, pining, and achingly honest underdog of great expectations and dwindling patience who knows all (or believes he does) and tells all. First published in 1982, Adrian Mole’s chronicle of angst has sold more than 20 million copies worldwide, spawned seven sequels, been adapted for television, and staged as a musical—truly “a phenomenon” (The Washington Post).
 
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13and ¾: Adrian Mole must amass his grievances—his acne vulgaris is grotesque; his crush, Pandora, has received seventeen Valentine’s Day cards (seventeen!); his PE teacher is a sadist; he fears his parents’ marriage is over since they no longer smoke together; his dog has gone AWOL; no one appreciates his poetry; and Animal Farm has set him off pork for good. If everyone were as appalled as Adrian Mole, it would be a better world. For now, for us, it’s just “screamingly funny” (The Sunday Times).
 
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole: Growing up among inferiors in Great Britain isn’t easy for a sensitive “poet of the Midlands” like Adrian, considering everything in the world is conspiring to scar him for life—his hormones are in a maelstrom; his mother is pregnant (at her age!); his girlfriend is in shut down; and he’s become allergic to non-precious metals. As his “crisply hilarious saga” (Booklist) continues, the changes Adrian undergoes will surely be profound.
 
“Townsend’s wit is razor sharp” (Daily Mirror) as she shows us the world through the haunted eyes of her luckless teenage diarist and self-proclaimed “undiscovered intellectual,” proving again and again why she’s been called “a national treasure” (The New York Times Book Review).
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