Victim: The Other Side of Murder

Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
2
Free sample

The New York Times–bestselling author’s pioneering true crime classic: It’s “Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood turned inside out” (Newsweek).
 
During an armed robbery in 1974, five hostages were holed up in the basement of a small home-audio store in Odgen, Utah, by a group of enlisted US Air Force airmen stationed at a nearby base. The victims—including wife and mother Carol Naisbitt—were brutally tortured, shot in the head, and left for dead. Incredibly Carol’s sixteen-year-old son made it out alive—and “the emotional strain his family underwent during his year-long hospitalization, is the heart of Kinder’s story” (Kirkus Reviews).
 
In Victim, the first book to go beyond the headlines to tell an unfathomable story of love, loss, courage, and survival, “the crime in question becomes not merely something that happened to somebody else somewhere else, but rather an event that touches us all firsthand and very deeply.” A compelling and tragic look at how lives can be changed forever by a random act of violence, it remains one of the most influential books in the victims’ rights movement and has become required reading for trainees at the FBI Academy at Quantico (Boston Herald).
 
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About the author

Gary Kinder is the author of the true crime classic, Victim: The Other Side of Murder (1980), Light Years: An Investigation into the Extraterrestrial Experiences of Eduard Meier (1987), and the New York Times bestseller, Ship of Gold in the Deep Blue Sea (1998). Since 1988, Kinder has taught legal writing to lawyers and judges throughout the United States. In 2012, Kinder founded the software company WordRake. The company’s eponymous software is an automated editing program that suggests changes to improve brevity and clarity. He has also worked as a consultant, delivering seminars on legal writing at law firms and corporate legal department. Kinder has also created popular training programs for the American Bar Association.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
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Published on
Dec 1, 2007
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9781555847975
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Language
English
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Genres
True Crime / Murder / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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September 1875. With nearly six hundred passengers returning from the California Gold Rush, the side-wheel steamer SS Central America encountered a violent storm and sank two hundred miles off the Carolina coast. More than four hundred lives and twenty-one tons of gold were lost. It was a tragedy lost in legend for more than a century—until a brilliant young engineer named Tommy Thompson set out to find the wreck.
 
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   -  NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST 

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