The Far Shore

Open Road Media
5
Free sample

June 6, 1944, D-Day: Allied forces took the beaches at Normandy—and the naval engineering genius of Edward Ellsberg would play a crucial part.

Before World War II, Edward Ellsberg had already established himself as a true innovator and master naval engineer, revolutionizing the salvage and rescue of sunken vessels like no one before. Then, having served his country for over a decade, he retired to private life.
 
But his work was not finished. Within hours of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the aging and physically ill Ellsberg was on a train to Washington, DC, to offer his services once again. And they would be needed for the greatest military invasion in human history.
 
In The Far Shore, Rear Admiral Ellsberg describes in detail the meticulous preparation and efforts behind the Normandy Invasion—efforts that would keep the flow of men and materials streaming onto the beaches and into the heart of Europe. From dealing with the extremes of engineering possibilities to wrestling with the knowledge that countless lives would depend on the success of his intricate planning, Ellsberg would work himself into exhaustion to do his part. His achievements would eventually earn him the Distinguished Service Medal and lead to his appointment as an Officer of the Order of the British Empire.
 
Vividly described by a man who saw firsthand the horrors of war and the cost of victory, The Far Shore takes readers through the brutal surf, onto the bloody beaches, and into the mind of one of World War II’s little-known heroes.
 
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About the author

Edward Ellsberg (1891–1983) graduated first in his class from the United States Naval Academy in 1914. After he did a stint aboard the USS Texas, the navy sent Ellsberg to Massachusetts Institute of Technology for postgraduate training in naval architecture. In 1925, he played a key role in the salvage of the sunken submarine USS S-51 and became the first naval officer to qualify as a deep-sea diver. Ellsberg later received the Distinguished Service Medal for his innovations and hard work.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jun 24, 2014
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Pages
294
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ISBN
9781480493629
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / United States
History / Military / World War II
History / Modern / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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