The Liberty Incident Revealed: The Definitive Account of the 1967 Israeli Attack on the U.S. Navy Spy Ship

Naval Institute Press
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Cutting through all of the controversy and conspiracy theories about Israel’s deadly attack on the USS Liberty in June 1967 at the height of the Six Day War, Cristol revises his well-regarded book about the event with a complete, in-depth analysis of all of the sources, including recently released tapes from National Security Agency. When the first edition of The Liberty Incident was published in 2002 there remained many unanswered questions about Israeli Air Force audio tapes intercepted by the NSA. Some alleged they would prove that the Israeli attack was premeditated. Cristol’s successful Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the National Security Agency, while resulting in the release of those tapes, has been greeted by anti-Israel sources insisting that the NSA tapes are fraudulent and are part of a larger conspiracy to deceive the American public!

After a quarter of a century of intensive research in Israel and the U.S., researching all relevant archives from NSA, CIA and the State Department, reviewing both formerly classified and open source documents, and interviewing all then-living individuals directly involved in the incident, the factual and documentary record is clear. Cristol maintains that despite the fact that all of the official records and transcripts are now available for review, the truth has proven to be of no interest to those individuals and organizations who are motivated by hidden agendas, wish to keep conspiracy theories alive, or are trying to feed sensational stories to the media. Documenting his findings in six new chapters, Cristol establishes in THE LIBERTY INCIDENT REVEALED that the Israeli attack was a tragic mistake and presents a convincing argument that will be regarded as the final story about this incident.
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About the author

A. Jay Cristol is a federal judge serving the southern district of Florida. An aviation enthusiast, he spent eighteen years as a naval aviator and twenty in the Navy's Judge Advocate General Corps. He retired as a captain in the U.S. Navy Reserve.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Naval Institute Press
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Published on
Aug 21, 2013
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Pages
416
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ISBN
9781612513874
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / United States
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Stephen E. Ambrose’s iconic New York Times bestseller about the ordinary men who became the World War II’s most extraordinary soldiers: Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, US Army.

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This is the story of the men who fought, of the martinet they hated who trained them well, and of the captain they loved who led them. E Company was a company of men who went hungry, froze, and died for each other, a company that took 150 percent casualties, a company where the Purple Heart was not a medal—it was a badge of office.
“A thrilling action ride of a book” (The New York Times Book Review)—from Jerry Bruckheimer in theaters everywhere January 19, 2018—the New York Times bestselling, true-life account of a US Special Forces team deployed to dangerous, war-ridden Afghanistan in the weeks following 9/11.

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During a surrender of six hundred Taliban troops, the Horse Soldiers were ambushed by the would-be POWs. Dangerously overpowered, they fought for their lives in the city’s immense fortress, Qala-i-Janghi, or the House of War. At risk were the military gains of the entire campaign: if the soldiers perished or were captured, the entire effort to outmaneuver the Taliban was likely doomed.

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Another history pageturner from the authors of the #1 bestsellers George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates.

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