Why I March: Images from The Women's March Around the World

Abrams
3
Free sample

On January 21, 2017, five million people in 82 countries and on all seven continents stood up with one voice. The Women’s March began with one cause, women’s rights, but quickly became a movement around the many issues that were hotly debated during the 2016 U.S. presidential race—immigration, health care, environmental protections, LGBTQ rights, racial justice, freedom of religion, and workers’ rights, among others. In the mere 66 days between the election and inauguration of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States, 673 sister marches sprang up across the country and the world. ABRAMS Image presents Why I March to honor the movement, give back to it, and promote future activism in the same vein. All royalties from the sale of the book will be donated to nonprofit organizations affiliated with the March.
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About the author

Abrams Books
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Additional Information

Publisher
Abrams
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Published on
Feb 21, 2017
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9781683351955
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Language
English
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Genres
Photography / Photojournalism
Photography / Subjects & Themes / Historical
Political Science / Civil Rights
Political Science / Human Rights
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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