A Tale Dark and Grimm

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Ages 9-12
282
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In this mischievous and utterly original debut, Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm-inspired tales. As readers follow the siblings through a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind (and beyond) the bread crumbs, edible houses, and outwitted witches.

Fairy tales have never been more irreverent or subversive as Hansel and Gretel learn to take charge of their destinies and become the clever architects of their own happily ever after.

 

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More by Adam Gidwitz

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Once upon a time, fairy tales were grim.
 
Cinderella’s stepsisters got their eyes pecked out by birds.
 
Rumpelstiltskin ripped himself in half.
 
And in a tale called “The Mouse, the Bird, and the Sausage,” a mouse, a bird, and a sausage all talk to each other. Yes, the sausage talks. (Okay, I guess that one’s not that grim…)
 
Those are the real fairy tales.
 
But they have nothing on the story I’m about to tell.
 
This is the darkest fairy tale of all. Also, it is the weirdest. And the bloodiest.
 
It is the grimmest tale I have ever heard.
 
And I am sharing it with you.
 
Two children venture through forests, flee kingdoms, face ogres and demons and monsters, and, ultimately, find their way home. Oh yes, and they may die. Just once or twice. 
 
That’s right. Fairy tales
Are
Awesome.   


* “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, and Gidwitz deploys his successful formula of bloody happenings and narratorial intrusion in his third and final installment of unexpurgated fairy tales. … Underneath the gore, the wit, and the trips to Hell and back, this book makes it clearer than ever that Gidwitz truly cares about the kids he writes for.” —Publishers Weekly starred review
 
“Entertaining story-mongering, with traditional and original tropes artfully intertwined.”—Kirkus Reviews

“The conclusion to the trilogy that began with A Tale Dark and Grimm (2010) and continued with In a Glass Grimmly (2012, both Dutton) is equally gorey and awesomely dark. ... As innovative as they are traditional, the stories maintain clear connections with traditional Grimm tales while creatively connecting to the narrative, and all the while keeping the proceedings undeniably grisly and lurid. … Readers will rejoice.”— School Library Journal
4.5
282 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
Oct 28, 2010
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781101445280
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Fiction / Action & Adventure / General
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Adaptations
Juvenile Fiction / Humorous Stories
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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You’re Never Too Young to Fight Censorship!

In Ban This Book by Alan Gratz, a fourth grader fights back when From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg is challenged by a well-meaning parent and taken off the shelves of her school library. Amy Anne is shy and soft-spoken, but don’t mess with her when it comes to her favorite book in the whole world. Amy Anne and her lieutenants wage a battle for the books that will make you laugh and pump your fists as they start a secret banned books locker library, make up ridiculous reasons to ban every single book in the library to make a point, and take a stand against censorship.

Ban This Book is a stirring defense against censorship that’s perfect for middle grade readers. Let kids know that they can make a difference in their schools, communities, and lives!

“Readers, librarians, and all those books that have drawn a challenge have a brand new hero.... Stand up and cheer, book lovers. This one’s for you." —Kathi Appelt, author of the Newbery Honor-winning The Underneath

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"A stout defense of the right to read." —Kirkus Reviews

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At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Once upon a time, fairy tales were grim.
 
Cinderella’s stepsisters got their eyes pecked out by birds.
 
Rumpelstiltskin ripped himself in half.
 
And in a tale called “The Mouse, the Bird, and the Sausage,” a mouse, a bird, and a sausage all talk to each other. Yes, the sausage talks. (Okay, I guess that one’s not that grim…)
 
Those are the real fairy tales.
 
But they have nothing on the story I’m about to tell.
 
This is the darkest fairy tale of all. Also, it is the weirdest. And the bloodiest.
 
It is the grimmest tale I have ever heard.
 
And I am sharing it with you.
 
Two children venture through forests, flee kingdoms, face ogres and demons and monsters, and, ultimately, find their way home. Oh yes, and they may die. Just once or twice. 
 
That’s right. Fairy tales
Are
Awesome.   


* “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, and Gidwitz deploys his successful formula of bloody happenings and narratorial intrusion in his third and final installment of unexpurgated fairy tales. … Underneath the gore, the wit, and the trips to Hell and back, this book makes it clearer than ever that Gidwitz truly cares about the kids he writes for.” —Publishers Weekly starred review
 
“Entertaining story-mongering, with traditional and original tropes artfully intertwined.”—Kirkus Reviews

“The conclusion to the trilogy that began with A Tale Dark and Grimm (2010) and continued with In a Glass Grimmly (2012, both Dutton) is equally gorey and awesomely dark. ... As innovative as they are traditional, the stories maintain clear connections with traditional Grimm tales while creatively connecting to the narrative, and all the while keeping the proceedings undeniably grisly and lurid. … Readers will rejoice.”— School Library Journal
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