Mobile User Experience: Patterns to Make Sense of it All

Newnes
8
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This is your must-have resource to the theoretical and practical concepts of mobile UX. You’ll learn about the concepts and how to apply them in real-world scenarios. Throughout the book, the author provides you with 10 of the most commonly used archetypes in the UX arena to help illustrate what mobile UX is and how you can master it as quickly as possible. First, you’ll start off learning how to communicate mobile UX flows visually. From there, you’ll learn about applying and using 10 unique user experience patterns or archetypes for mobile. Finally, you’ll understand how to prototype and use these patterns to create websites and apps.

Whether you’re a UX professional looking to master mobility or a designer looking to incorporate the best UX practices into your website, after reading this book, you’ll be better equipped to maneuver this emerging specialty.

  • Addresses the gap between theoretical concepts and the practical application of mobile user experience design
  • Illustrates concepts and examples through an abundance of diagrams, flows, and patterns
  • Explains the differences in touch gestures, user interface elements, and usage patterns across the most common mobile platforms
  • Includes real-world examples and case studies for this rapidly growing field
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About the author

Adrian Mendoza’s career is highlighted by over twelve years of design and user experience in the handheld, pharmaceutical, financial, and educational sectors. His first studio, Synthesis3, worked with several Palm OS software companies in creating a brand for web and retail prominence. In the financial and education sector, customers included Sovereign Bank, Houghton Mifflin, MIT and Harvard. Adrian consulted as a UX Expert and in Information Architect lead roles for Fidelity’s E-business design group, Thomson Financial, Razorfish, Sapient, and T. Rowe Price. Adrian earned his BA from the University of Southern California and his Masters from the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Currently he is a partner at Mendoza Design, a Boston-based UX and design consultancy; and is a co-founder of Marlin Mobile a user experience, optimization, and performance company. Additionally, he is a senior lecturer at Mass Art in Boston, MA

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Additional Information

Publisher
Newnes
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Published on
Sep 3, 2013
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Pages
248
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ISBN
9780124114906
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Social Aspects / Human-Computer Interaction
Technology & Engineering / Mobile & Wireless Communications
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways.

Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection.

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Time is a precious commodity, especially if you're a system administrator. No other job pulls people in so many directions at once. Users interrupt you constantly with requests, preventing you from getting anything done. Your managers want you to get long-term projects done but flood you with requests for quick-fixes that prevent you from ever getting to those long-term projects. But the pressure is on you to produce and it only increases with time. What do you do?

The answer is time management. And not just any time management theory--you want Time Management for System Administrators, to be exact. With keen insights into the challenges you face as a sys admin, bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli has put together a collection of tips and techniques that will help you cultivate the time management skills you need to flourish as a system administrator.

Time Management for System Administrators understands that an Sys Admin often has competing goals: the concurrent responsibilities of working on large projects and taking care of a user's needs. That's why it focuses on strategies that help you work through daily tasks, yet still allow you to handle critical situations that inevitably arise.

Among other skills, you'll learn how to:

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