Does Carbon-Conscious Behavior Drive Firm Performance?: An Event Study on the Global 500 Companies

Springer Science & Business Media
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Adrian Renner provides a unique perspective on how stockholders react if companies move towards a carbon-conscious future. A multi-country event study approach was used to analyze stock market reactions of the largest 500 companies globally.
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About the author

Dr. Adrian Renner completed his doctoral thesis at the chair of industrial management at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jun 7, 2011
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Pages
168
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ISBN
9783834962249
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Finance / General
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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LECTURING BIRDS ON FLYING

For the past few decades, the financial world has often displayed an unreasonable willingness to believe that "the model is right, the market is wrong," in spite of the fact that these theoretical machinations were largely responsible for the stock market crash of 1987, the LTCM crisis of 1998, the credit crisis of 2008, and many other blow-ups, large and small. Why have both financial insiders (traders, risk managers, executives) and outsiders (academics, journalists, regulators, the public) consistently demonstrated a willingness to treat quantifications as gospel? Nassim Taleb first addressed the conflicts between theoretical and real finance in his technical treatise on options, Dynamic Hedging. Now, in Lecturing Birds on Flying, Pablo Triana offers a powerful indictment on the trustworthiness of financial theory, explaining—in jargon-free plain English—how malfunctions in these quantitative machines have wreaked havoc in our real world.

Triana first analyzes the fundamental question of whether financial markets can in principle really be solved mathematically. He shows that the markets indeed cannot be tamed with equations, presenting a long and powerful list of obstacles to prove his point: maverick unlawful human actions rule the markets, unexpected and unimaginable events shape the markets, and historical data is not necessarily a trustworthy guide to the future of the markets. The author then examines the sources of origin of many prevalent theories and mathematical dictums. He details how the field of financial economics evolved from a descriptive discipline to an abstract one dedicated to technically concocting professors' own versions of how such a world should work. He goes on to explain how Wall Street and other financial centers became eager employers of scientists, and how scientists became eager employees of financial firms. Triana concludes with an in-depth discussion of the most significant historical episodes of theory-caused real-life market malaise, with a strong emphasis on the current credit crisis.

In the end, Lecturing Birds on Flying calls for the radical substitution of good old-fashioned common sense in place of mathematical decision-making and the restoration to financial power of those who are completely unchained to the iron ball of classroom-obtained qualifications.

Deep coverage and rigorous examination of international corporate finance

Multinational Finance offers an advanced exploration of international corporate finance concepts and operations. Despite its status as one of the most rigorous texts on the topic, this book remains accessible and readable without sacrificing depth of coverage. Sidebars, key terms, essays, conceptual questions, and problems with solutions help aid in the learning process, while suggested readings and PowerPoint handouts reinforce the material and offer avenues for further exploration. This new sixth edition includes Excel templates that allow students to use real-world tools in a learning environment, and the modular structure facilitates course customization to individual objectives, interests, and preparatory level. The emphasis is on the basics of financial management, but coverage includes unique chapters on treasury management, asset pricing, hedging, options, and portfolio management in addition to traditional finance topics.

International finance is a diverse field with myriad specialties and a vast array of possible interests. This book allows students to view the field through the lens of a financial manager with investment or financial options in more than one country to give them a practical feel for real-world application.

Understand the nature and operations of international corporate finance Evaluate opportunities, costs, and risks of multinational operations See beyond the numbers and terminology to the general principles at work Learn the markets, currencies, taxation, capital structure, governance, and more

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Gregory Zuckerman, the bestselling author of The Greatest Trade Ever and The Frackers, answers the question investors have been asking for decades: How did Jim Simons do it?

Shortlisted for the Financial Times/McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award

Jim Simons is the greatest money maker in modern financial history. No other investor--Warren Buffett, Peter Lynch, Ray Dalio, Steve Cohen, or George Soros--can touch his record. Since 1988, Renaissance's signature Medallion fund has generated average annual returns of 66 percent. The firm has earned profits of more than $100 billion; Simons is worth twenty-three billion dollars.

Drawing on unprecedented access to Simons and dozens of current and former employees, Zuckerman, a veteran Wall Street Journal investigative reporter, tells the gripping story of how a world-class mathematician and former code breaker mastered the market. Simons pioneered a data-driven, algorithmic approach that's sweeping the world.

As Renaissance became a market force, its executives began influencing the world beyond finance. Simons became a major figure in scientific research, education, and liberal politics. Senior executive Robert Mercer is more responsible than anyone else for the Trump presidency, placing Steve Bannon in the campaign and funding Trump's victorious 2016 effort. Mercer also impacted the campaign behind Brexit.

The Man Who Solved the Market is a portrait of a modern-day Midas who remade markets in his own image, but failed to anticipate how his success would impact his firm and his country. It's also a story of what Simons's revolution means for the rest of us.
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