Agamemnon in Plain and Simple English (Translated)

BookCaps Study Guides
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Revenge. Adultery. Murder. It certainly sounds like a lively play. Unfortunately, archaic translation make understanding Aeschylus' "Agamemnon" a little difficult. Until now! If you have struggled in the past reading the ancient classic, then BookCaps can help you out. This book is a modern translation with a fresh spin. The original text is also presented in the book with a comparable version of the modern text. We all need refreshers every now and then. Whether you are a student trying to cram for that big final, or someone just trying to understand a book more, BookCaps can help. We are a small, but growing company, and are adding titles every month.
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About the author

Aeschylus was born at Eleusis of a noble family. He fought at the Battle of Marathon (490 b.c.), where a small Greek band heroically defeated the invading Persians. At the time of his death in Sicily, Athens was in its golden age. In all of his extant works, his intense love of Greece and Athens finds expression. Of the nearly 90 plays attributed to him, only 7 survive. These are The Persians (produced in 472 b.c.), Seven against Thebes (467 b.c.), The Oresteia (458 b.c.)---which includes Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides (or Furies) --- Suppliants (463 b.c.), and Prometheus Bound (c.460 b.c.). Six of the seven present mythological stories. The ornate language creates a mood of tragedy and reinforces the already stylized character of the Greek theater. Aeschylus called his prodigious output "dry scraps from Homer's banquet," because his plots and solemn language are derived from the epic poet. But a more accurate summation of Aeschylus would emphasize his grandeur of mind and spirit and the tragic dignity of his language. Because of his patriotism and belief in divine providence, there is a profound moral order to his plays. Characters such as Clytemnestra, Orestes, and Prometheus personify a great passion or principle. As individuals they conflict with divine will, but, ultimately, justice prevails. Aeschylus's introduction of the second actor made real theater possible, because the two could address each other and act several roles. His successors imitated his costumes, dances, spectacular effects, long descriptions, choral refrains, invocations, and dialogue. Swinburne's (see Vol. 1) enthusiasm for The Oresteia sums up all praises of Aeschylus; he called it simply "the greatest achievement of the human mind." Because of his great achievements, Aeschylus might be considered the "father of tragedy.

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Additional Information

Publisher
BookCaps Study Guides
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Published on
Mar 29, 2013
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Pages
139
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ISBN
9781621075561
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Drama / General
Fiction / Classics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reading information

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Aeschylus II contains “The Oresteia,” translated by Richmond Lattimore, and fragments of “Proteus,” translated by Mark Griffith. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides’ Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles’s satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.
The Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Latin and Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Aeschylus, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Aeschylus' life and works
* Features the complete extant works of Aeschylus, in both English translation and the original Greek
* Concise introductions to the plays
* Provides rare fragments of Aeschylus' lost plays
* Includes translations previously appearing in Loeb Classical Library editions of Aeschylus' works
* Images of famous paintings that have been inspired by Aeschylus' works
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Easily locate the plays or fragments you want to read with individual contents tables
* Features two bonus biographies - discover Aeschylus' ancient world
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

Please note: some EReader software programs cannot display Greek characters correctly, however they do display correctly on EReader devices.

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles

CONTENTS:

The Translations
THE PERSIANS
SEVEN AGAINST THEBES
THE SUPPLIANTS
AGAMEMNON
THE LIBATION BEARERS
THE EUMENIDES
PROMETHEUS BOUND
FRAGMENTS

The Greek Texts
LIST OF GREEK TEXTS

The Biographies
INTRODUCTION TO AESCHYLUS by E. D. A. Morshead
AESCHYLUS by T. W. LUMB

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles
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