Propos de littérature

République des Lettres

Texte intégral révisé suivi d'une biographie d'Alain. Poème en prose écrit quotidiennement, exercice du style et de la pensée, le "propos" est un genre littéraire inventé par Alain. Dans "Propos de littérature", il devient une analyse, un commentaire, un commerce lucide avec les chefs-d'oeuvre du présent ou du passé, de Dante à Proust en passant entre autres par Rabelais, La Fontaine, Molière, Goethe ou Stendhal. Page après page, l'auteur des "Propos sur le bonheur" s'interroge sur le sens de l'épopée, et de la tragédie, du roman, de la poésie. Il délibère du goût, de la langue, de la lecture, de la rhétorique, de la traduction, de l'imagination, de l'art d'écrire... Il définit le rôle possible de la critique. "Notre ambition fut de changer la philosophie en littérature et la littérature en philosophie", écrit-il. La tentative, ici, a pleinement abouti.

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Additional Information

Publisher
République des Lettres
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Published on
Feb 21, 2017
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9782824903545
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Language
French
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Literacy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Alain de Botton
“An engrossing tale [that] provides plenty of food for thought” (People, Best New Books pick), this playful, wise, and profoundly moving second novel from the internationally bestselling author of How Proust Can Change Your Life tracks the beautifully complicated arc of a romantic partnership.

We all know the headiness and excitement of the early days of love. But what comes after? In Edinburgh, a couple, Rabih and Kirsten, fall in love. They get married, they have children—but no long-term relationship is as simple as “happily ever after.” The Course of Love explores what happens after the birth of love, what it takes to maintain, and what happens to our original ideals under the pressures of an average existence. We see, along with Rabih and Kirsten, the first flush of infatuation, the effortlessness of falling into romantic love, and the course of life thereafter. Interwoven with their story and its challenges is an overlay of philosophy—an annotation and a guide to what we are reading. As The New York Times says, “The Course of Love is a return to the form that made Mr. de Botton’s name in the mid-1990s….love is the subject best suited to his obsessive aphorizing, and in this novel he again shows off his ability to pin our hopes, methods, and insecurities to the page.”

This is a Romantic novel in the true sense, one interested in exploring how love can survive and thrive in the long term. The result is a sensory experience—fictional, philosophical, psychological—that urges us to identify deeply with these characters and to reflect on his and her own experiences in love. Fresh, visceral, and utterly compelling, The Course of Love is a provocative and life-affirming novel for everyone who believes in love. “There’s no writer alive like de Botton, and his latest ambitious undertaking is as enlightening and humanizing as his previous works” (Chicago Tribune).
Alain Mabanckou
One of The New York Times 10 French Novels to Read Now

Longlisted for the Aspen Words Literary Prize

Longlisted for the PEN America Translation Prize

Shortlisted for the Albertine Prize

Included in World Literature Today’s “75 Notable Translations of 2017”

“The story’s unflinching tone and sly humor belie the tragedy of Moses’s situation, as well as the cruelty of the people he meets.”
—The New Yorker

“An orphan story with biting humor. . . as pointed as it is funny.”
—Los Angeles Times

“[Black Moses] rings with a beautiful poetry.”
—Wall Street Journal

A rollicking new novel described as “Oliver Twist in 1970s Africa” (Les Inrockuptibles) by the finalist for the Man Booker International Prize.

It's not easy being Tokumisa Nzambe po Mose yamoyindo abotami namboka ya Bakoko. There's that long name of his for a start, which means, "Let us thank God, the black Moses is born on the lands of the ancestors." Most people just call him Moses. Then there's the orphanage where he lives, run by a malicious political stooge, Dieudonné Ngoulmoumako, and where he's terrorized by two fellow orphans—the twins Songi-Songi and Tala-Tala.

But after Moses exacts revenge on the twins by lacing their food with hot pepper, the twins take Moses under their wing, escape the orphanage, and move to the bustling port town of Pointe-Noire, where they form a gang that survives on petty theft. What follows is a funny, moving, larger-than-life tale that chronicles Moses's ultimately tragic journey through the Pointe-Noire underworld and the politically repressive world of Congo-Brazzaville in the 1970s and 80s.

Mabanckou's vivid portrayal of Moses's mental collapse echoes the work of Hugo, Dickens, and Brian DePalma's Scarface, confirming Mabanckou's status as one of our great storytellers. Black Moses is a vital new extension of his cycle of Pointe-Noire novels that stand out as one of the grandest, funniest, fictional projects of our time.
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