The Gospel of Hemp: How Hemp Can Save Our World

Alan Archuleta
97

In 1916, the USDA published Bulletin No. 404, a report on using hemp hurds as a paper-making material. The bulletin proclaims that: “Without a doubt, hemp will continue to be one of the staple agricultural crops of the United States.” The report also warns that: “Our forests are being cut three times faster than they grow.” It finds that (over a 20-year period) 10,000 acres of hemp can produce the same amount of paper as 40,500 acres of trees. The test results are so favorable that USDA Bulletin #404 is printed on paper made from hemp!

"The Gospel of Hemp" explains why a crop that was hailed as a "one of the staple agricultural crops of The United States" in a U.S. government report was deceptivley made essentially illegal in 1937. The time has come for America and the world to correct this deception and injustice for the future of our planet.
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About the author

Alan Archuleta was about to graduate from one of the leading agricultural schools on the planet (The University of California, Davis) when a neighbor gave him a book about a plant that changed his life. It was a life-changing moment for him, because he knew that NONE of this information was being taught at the university. "The Emperor Wears No Clothes" by Jack Herer opened Alan's eyes to the important role hemp had played in the founding of America, why it was outlawed, and how hemp can save the American economy...and our world! Jack's book inspired this one. This is the story of this life-change, and part of the author's mission to spread "The Gospel of Hemp"
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4.4
97 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Alan Archuleta
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Published on
Jul 10, 2012
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Pages
39
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ISBN
9781623093341
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Chemistry / Environmental
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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In the mid-twentieth century the digital revolution began with the introduction of the first electronic computers, which were first introduced into companies and in the state bodies then they spread strongly in the private houses as personal computers; later all these computers were connected to each other by a global telecommunication network called Internet, which had a massive development at the end of the century becoming the backbone of the worldwide information circulation.
At the beginning of the 21st century the digital revolution was completed and the information of any kind (texts, images, video clips and TV broadcasts, music and songs, WEB pages) started to be recorded and disseminated in digital form rather than with a traditional media (paper, film, magnetic tape), with a displacement that engaged all human activities of any type, both collective and individual.
While the development of digital technology continue at an accelerated pace the problem of information retention begin to arise, what was previously mainly entrusted to printing on paper and now is in abandonment phase: printed records are increasingly transformed into digital format and the new information is generated directly in electronic form. But while a book or a letter could be read directly even centuries after their writing, digital information has a short life because of the same technological development, that makes quickly obsolete any recording by irreversibly mutating both its hardware and reading software; other recordings arethen volatile by their very nature, such as e-mails or WEB pages, even if they could host information that could be of value in the future.
Moreover digital recordings are carried out in a great variety of different formats, sometimes incompatible with each other or subject themselves to obsolescence, thus unnecessarily complicating the task of preserving their content.
Most part of human culture, gradually poured into electronic form, is now jeopardized, and we risk of delivering to posterity a world without history: this book describes the current situation and what is sought to do to remedy the danger.
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