The Half-Empty Heart: A Supportive Guide to Breaking Free from Chronic Discontent: Overcome Low-Grade Depression Once and for All

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Finally, a book of insightful and practical advice for the millions of people suffering from low-grade depression, also known as dysthymia or chronic discontent

Frustrated. Stressed. Irritable. Discouraged. Cynical. Fed up. These are among the feelings experienced by millions of people. Whether they realize it or not, their feelings are not caused by a negative attitude, a lack of gratitude, or laziness. Rather, these feelings are among the symptoms of a condition called dysthymia, also known as chronic discontent or low-grade depression. It blocks feelings of happiness, contentment, and passion, leaving emptiness, a lack of meaning, and despair.

This powerful and practical book explains how this condition takes hold—and presents simple yet profound ways to overcome it once and for all. Using anecdotes from his private practice as well as insightful questions and exercises, psychotherapist Alan Downs, Ph.D., shines light into the dark corners of this isolating and debilitating condition and includes a five-week program to help you feel good again.

Not a superficial, magic-bullet approach, The Half-Empty Heart is a probing, honest book that offers a path to meaningful change. The path begins here.

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Additional Information

Publisher
St. Martin's Press
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Published on
Apr 1, 2007
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781429973144
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Self-Help / Mood Disorders / Depression
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Histologically, muscle is conveniently divided into two groups, striated and nonstriated, based on whether the cells exhibit cross-striations in the light microscope (Figure 3). Smooth muscle is involuntary: its contraction is controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Striated muscle includes both cardiac (involuntary) and skeletal (voluntary). The former is innervated by visceral efferent fibers of the autonomic nervous system, whereas the latter is innervated by somatic efferent fibers, most of which have their cell bodies in the ventral, motor horn of the spinal cord. Smooth muscle is designed to have slow, relatively sustained contractions, while striated muscle contracts rapidly and usually phasically. Both cardiac and smooth muscle cells are mononucleated, whereas skeletal muscle cells (fibers) are multinucleated. [In aging hearts or hypertrophied hearts, cardiac muscle cells are often binucleated.] Multinucleation of skeletal muscle arises during development by the cytoplasmic fusion of muscle precursor cells, myoblasts. Adult skeletal muscle cells do not divide; that is also true of most cardiac myocytes. However, skeletal muscle exhibits a considerable amount of regeneration after injury. This is because adult skeletal muscle contains a stem cell, the satellite cell, which lies beneath the basement membrane surrounding the muscle fibers. [The multinucleation of cardiac muscle arises from karyokinesis without cytokinesis.] A diagrammatic series of enlargements of skeletal muscle are shown in Figure 4. A bundle of muscle fibers (fasciculus) is cut from the deltoid muscle. Each muscle cell is termed a myofiber or muscle fiber. Each muscle fiber contains contractile organelles termed myofibrils, which contain the contractile units of muscle termed sarcomeres. The sarcomeres are composed of myofilaments, which in turn are composed of contractile proteins. Muscle connective tissue layers are organized in concentric layers that are important in the entry and exit of vessels and nerves to and from the tissue. These are shown in Figure 5. The outermost layer is the epimysium or muscle sheath. Connective tissue septae (perimysium) run radially into the muscle tissue, dividing it into muscle fascicles. The deepest layer, surrounding each of the muscle fibers is the endomysium. The endomysium is in direct contact with a basal lamina that ensheathes each muscle fiber. It surrounds the plasma membrane of the muscle fiber termed the sarcolemma.
“My book … details the living hell that was my experience with concussions. The majority of this story was kept from even my closest relationships. It wasn’t easy, but it’s time to tell it.” – Dale Jr.

It was a seemingly minor crash at Michigan International Speedway in June 2016 that ended the day early for Dale Earnhardt Jr. What he didn’t know was that it would also end his driving for the year. He’d dealt with concussions before, but concussions are like snowflakes—no two are the same. And recovery can be brutal—and lengthy.

As a third-generation driver in a family forever connected to the sport of stock-car racing, how could Dale Earnhardt Jr. sit on the sidelines and watch everyone else take their laps? It was one of the toughest seasons of his life—one that changed him forever.

In this gripping narrative from one of professional sports’ most beloved figures, Dale Jr. shares stories from his journey: how his career and his injury have transformed him, how he made the decision to retire at the end of the 2017 season after eighteen years behind the wheel, and what lies ahead for him in the next chapter of his life. There’s no second-guessing and no regrets from Driver #88. He simply wants to go out on his own terms and make the rest of his life off the racetrack count. Junior says, “I don’t want these last races to be just about me but rather the people who made my success possible: my fans, the folks who pack the grandstands rain or shine, my teammates and crew members through the years, industry colleagues, track volunteers, friends, family, sponsors. They’ve all played a role. I couldn’t have done it without them.”

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