The Wireless in the Corner: A boy’s eye view of London in peace and war

Troubador Publishing Ltd
Free sample

Based on diary entries, family letters, photography albums and newspaper cuttings, The Wireless in the Corner is the personal account of a boy brought up in London’s suburbia during the second quarter of the 20th century, the years English historian, Asa Briggs, called ‘the Golden Age of Broadcasting’. Drawing on his sharp visual and aural memory, author Alan Palmer recounts his early life as the only child of elderly parents living at Gants Hill in unfashionable Ilford. After a trip to Belgium, aged six, Alan became gripped by the events in Europe and observing international affairs became as much a hobby as collecting stamps. Listening to the wireless every evening, Alan’s childhood is as much a personalised political, social and military history as it is reminiscence. The Wireless in the Corner is written with the intention of recapturing the strain of the Blitz, and later of flying bombs and rockets, and the relieving moments of peace and contentment that were held so dear to the author. The book carefully distinguishes between what was known then and what readers know now, so as not to obscure events with thoughts based on present assumptions. Inspired by A. J. P Taylor, and similar to the work of Philip Ziegler and A. L. Rowse, The Wireless in the Corner will appeal to readers interested in military history and autobiographies. It will also appeal to those interested in life during the war.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Troubador Publishing Ltd
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Published on
May 28, 2017
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Pages
200
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ISBN
9781788030472
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Autobiographical writing has a particular value as a literary form, especially when, as seems clear, the written style is quite to the point, lucid and communicates well. The richly detailed and colorful account of the life, loves and friendships built up around the most extraordinary life of John L Werrill . The panorama of experience, trials, determination, effort to succeed in a worldly competitive arena, is richly textured, well observed, and not without more than the usual touch of spice and intrigue. No matter what obstacle, the writer seldom say's no, to anything especially on any or all challenges that he faces, along the way, compelling the reader to remain with him as each incident unravels. Working up the chain of command in a ship's galley, John's efforts are relentless, imaginative, creative, inspiring, and not without his inherent humor which carries him over many seemingly, insurmountable issues and ongoing incidents. Seldom he is boring, and slow to think, plus without a definitive plan of future life, we can learn a good lesson of achievement and a sense of purpose as one reads. From one arena, to the other, aboard cruise liner's of mammoth proportions, the Chef de Cuisine is held in high regard, as well he should, and John continues on his helter skeltor journey to the eventual pinnacle, but not without stark reminders of daily life's realities, unfazed by many, who would prefer the home comfort's he left behind. To luxury, spacious yachts with no limits on time, demand, and satisfaction, for the very rich and some famous, we get a very rare insight into the daily goings on, both on shore in sumptuous homes around the globe. Sailing to parts unknown on a whim. Immaculate turn out, undeniable hilarity, to keep one guessing from the beginning to the end. One might very well feel out of breath, when you have read it. Book Reviews I found this book to be quite delightful. In all of Mr. Werrill's travels and experiences, given his writing style, I felt I was right there with him. In his colorful and careful descriptions of his life, one was left with a feeling of what's next for this very adventurous gentleman. He left me with a sense of my own personal longing to write of my adventures. Who knows, perhaps you'll have another interesting book to publish one day. I thoroughly enjoyed this read and certainly would buy any future books written by Mr. Werrill. -Marlene Cooper Williams Readers' Comments 1) Uproarious antics and escapades with shipmates, employers, colleagues, and lovers. 2) Rivals and surpasses "Benny Hill" in being rather risqueacute; and absolutely hilarious. 3) Always the sense of family, especially Mother, Louise 4) Uncanny ability to think on his feet to avert nearly all matters of trouble...virtually rendering himself unscathed nearly every time. 5) Strong sense of faith, and three true loves, Beverly, Kirsten and mother. 6) One event after another, stealing your breath one moment, with an OMG, then total laughter. 7) Life onboard ship, private yachts and in the servitude of some of San Francisco's wealthiest. 8) Left with the feeling of having been that fly on the wall, witnessing one man's life that goes beyond all others. 9) When asked: Is there anything you have not done, anyplace you have not been, and anyone you have not met...the simple answer would be "NO". 10) John L Werrill should receive an honorary professorship, and hit the lecture circuit, especially at the commence- ment of universities; he simply has so much to share of life experiences, which most people could not possibly envision. 11) An unbelievable sense of sadness upon Mr. Werrill's admission of a deep depression as he searches for his true SELF. 12) Having been there, done that...from top to bottom, front to back, and in between...there is renewal. 13) Yes, there should be a movie, but who would play this
The first volume of National Book Award finalist David Plante's extraordinary diaries of a life lived among the artistic elite in 1960s London.

“Nikos and I live together as lovers, as everyone knows, and we seem to be accepted because it's known that we are lovers. In fact, we are, according to the law, criminals in our making love with each other, but it is as if the laws don't apply. It is as if all the conventions of sex and clothes and art and music and drink and drugs don't apply here in London . . .”

In the 1960s, strangers to their new city and from the different worlds of New York and Athens, David and Nikos embarked on a life together, a partnership that would endure for forty years. At a moment of “absolute respect for differences,” London offered a freedom in love unattainable in their previous homes. Friendships with Stephen and Natasha Spender, Francis Bacon, Sonia Orwell, W. H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, Steven Runciman, David Hockney, and R. B. Kitaj, meetings with such Bloomsbury luminaries as E. M. Forster and Duncan Grant, and a developing friendship with Philip Roth living in London with Claire Bloom, opened up worlds within worlds; connections appeared to crisscross, invisibly, through the air, interconnecting everyone.

David Plante has kept a diary of his life for more than half a century. Both a deeply personal memoir and a fascinating and significant work of cultural history, this first volume spans his first twenty years in London, beginning in the mid-sixties, and pieces together fragments of diaries, notes, sketches, and drawings to reveal a beautiful, intimate portrait of a relationship and a luminous evocation of a world of writers, poets, artists, and thinkers.
As Alan Palmer himself writes in his preface, 'Alexander 1, ruler of Russia for the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is remembered today mainly on three counts: as the Tsar who refused to make peace with the French when Moscow fell in 1812; as the idealist who sought to bind Europe's sovereigns in a Holy Alliance in 1815; and as the Emperor who died - or gave the impression of having died - at the remote southern seaport of Taganrog in the winter of 1825. Recent interest has concentrated , perhaps excessively, on the third of these dramatic episodes akthough it is natural that the epic years of the struggle with Napoleon should continue to excite the historical imagination.'

He has been dubbed 'The Enigmatic Tsar'. There are many contrasting opinions of him. Thomas Jefferson declared 'A more virtuous man, I believe, does no exist, nor one who is more enthusiastically devoted to better the condition of mankind. Castlereagh thought well of him, too, but both Metternich and Napoleon considered him inconsistent and untrustworthy. And Pushkin famously described him as 'a Sphinx who carried his riddle with him to the tomb.' an assessment even more piquant if it is true, as some maintain, his tomb in empty.

With his customary blend of meticulous scholarship and agreeable writing, Alan Palmer provides the most balanced and engaging portrait imaginable.

'A pleasure to read and unlikely to be replaced for many years' Philip Ziegler, The Times

'Excellent . . . a major biographical achievement, a notable contribution to our understanding of this still enigmatic monarch' Robert Blake, Spectator

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States
 
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.
 
In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same.
#1 NEW YORK TIMES, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND BOSTON GLOBE BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW • ONE OF PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA’S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR • BILL GATES’S HOLIDAY READING LIST • FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE’S AWARD IN AUTOBIOGRAPHY • FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE’S JOHN LEONARD PRIZE FOR BEST FIRST BOOK • FINALIST FOR THE PEN/JEAN STEIN BOOK AWARD 

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • O: The Oprah Magazine • Time • NPR • Good Morning America • San Francisco Chronicle • The Guardian • The Economist • Financial Times • Newsday • New York Post • theSkimm • Refinery29 • Bloomberg • Self • Real Simple • Town & Country • Bustle • Paste • Publishers Weekly • Library Journal • LibraryReads • BookRiot • Pamela Paul, KQED • New York Public Library

An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University

Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

“Beautiful and propulsive . . . Despite the singularity of [Tara Westover’s] childhood, the questions her book poses are universal: How much of ourselves should we give to those we love? And how much must we betray them to grow up?”—Vogue

“Westover has somehow managed not only to capture her unsurpassably exceptional upbringing, but to make her current situation seem not so exceptional at all, and resonant for many others.”—The New York Times Book Review
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