Tropics of History: Cuba Imagined

Greenwood Publishing Group
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This study offers a unique perspective in interpreting the cultural politics of Cuba's complex history through an exploration of the country's literature. The book introduces readers to some of Cuba's most eminent and engaging voices by examining some of the historical tropes put forth by major writers. Drawing on an array of interpretive approaches from mythopoetic analysis to phenomenology, West addresses the work of Nancy Morej�n, Alejo Carpentier, Virgilio Pi�era, Dulce Mar�a Loynaz, Jos� Lezama Lima, and Severo Sarduy. This poetic look at Cuba's rich and turbulent history through the eyes of its writers will be of interest to students and scholars of Latin American history and culture.
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About the author

ALAN WEST is Professor of Spanish at Babson College. A Cuban-born writer, he is author of Being America, Roberto Clemente: A Baseball Legend, and José Martí: Man of Poetry, Soldier of Freedom. His most recent book of poems is the bilingual Dar nombres a la lluvia/Finding Voices in the Rain. West has translated the works of Elena Poniatowska, Luis Rafael Sanchez, Rosario Ferré, and Nancy Morejón.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
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Published on
Dec 31, 1997
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Pages
214
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ISBN
9780897893381
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Latin America / General
Literary Collections / Caribbean & Latin American
Literary Criticism / Caribbean & Latin American
Political Science / History & Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Carlos de la Torre
Encompassing Amazonian rainforests, Andean peaks, coastal lowlands, and the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador’s geography is notably diverse. So too are its history, culture, and politics, all of which are examined from many perspectives in The Ecuador Reader. Spanning the years before the arrival of the Spanish in the early 1500s to the present, this rich anthology addresses colonialism, independence, the nation’s integration into the world economy, and its tumultuous twentieth century. Interspersed among forty-eight written selections are more than three dozen images.

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