Australian Military Operations in Vietnam

Big Sky Publishing
2
Free sample

From 1962 to 1972 Australia joined the United States in fighting a communist inspired insurgency war in the jungles of South Vietnam against infiltrators who sought to overthrow the local government. Over 50,000 Australians served in Vietnam, 519 lost their lives, and the conflict ended ignominiously in the insurgents' victory. Over 30 years later, Australia again finds itself joined with the United States in a struggle against an insurgency, this time in the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan. Although now in the past, the Vietnam War resonates with lessons for the Australian Army as it strives to defeat not Communism but Terrorism. AUSTRALIAN MILITARY OPERATIONS IN VIETNAM highlights some of the successes and failures of an earlier generation of officers for the benefit of today's leaders.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Albert Palazzo is a research fellow in the School of History at the University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy in Sydney, Australia.

Read more
Collapse
5.0
2 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Big Sky Publishing
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 2006
Read more
Collapse
Pages
173
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781876439101
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
The first Australians committed to serve in Viet Nam were a group of military instructors known as the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam. Their initial role: to assist in the training of the ground forces of South Viet Nam. But battalion battles and artillery duels, the relief of besieged camps, and mobile strike forces became part of the mosaic that saw this curiously named unit forge a distinct chapter in Australia's military history. The Men Who Persevered is the story of their war.

The AATTV was in Viet Nam from July 1962 to December 1972. Nearly 1000 Australians and 11 New Zealanders served with The Team' groups across a wide spectrum of military posts throughout the South. The Team's history is revealed through the words of the men involved as their cables and reports discuss how Australia should be involved militarily. The Men who Persevered also lays bare the frantic pace of battles in I Corps and the Central Highlands and tells a story of compassion as medics and other men made valiant efforts to help the people help themselves. And in the end, it is a tale of bitterness and betrayal as the West abandoned their ally and withdrew with almost obscene haste to the comforts of home.

Many of the memories recounted here have not been told before, but age has not dimmed the memory of the ferocity of the battles or reduced the men's admiration for their comrades and their unit.

The Men Who Persevered includes an accurate and unique nominal roll of those who served where and when with The Team.

'The battle-scarred and bloody activities of the iconic but lonely Australian Army Training Team in Viet Nam are penetratingly described in this superbly researched account. If you are in any way interested in Australia's total involvement in Viet Nam you should possess this book.' Brigadier John Essex-Clark, DSM, (Ret.)

'I was most impressed by the background research, which adds considerably to the confused and ill-conceived participation in the first place. The story reads very well indeed and should certainly appeal to ex-AATTV members, to the interested general public and most importantly provide an authoritative history for the future. Congratulations on a mammoth effort to produce a professional and much- needed publication.' Colonel Alex Preece, DSO, MVO (Ret.) CO AATTV, 1965
Platoon Sergeant Bob Buick - decorated with the Military Medal for bravery for his actions during the Battle of Long Tan - tells in vivid and enthralling detail the story of his tour of Viet Nam. It culminates in the most famous battle involving Australian Diggers in the Viet Nam War, in which thirteen of Buick's men were killed and the remainder survived against overwhelming odds.

All Guts and No Glory is a no-pulled-punches account, covering all the major actions Buick's platoon encountered. It brings to life the frustrating, gut-wrenching and sorrowful experience of those who served as infantry warriors in Viet Nam, only to come home to an apathetic and sometimes hostile public. This is a poignant reminder of what combat, infantry soldiering and the Viet Nam war was all about. All Guts and No Glory also debunks the myths, lies and legends of the Long Tan Battle.

Bob Buick has collaborated with one of Australia's best-known authors of the Viet Nam era, Gary McKay, MC, himself a Viet Nam veteran and infantryman, to write this first-hand description of the Long Tan Battle and other operations against the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese Army.

'This extraordinary depiction of service in Viet Nam points to the real need for comprehensive writings on the wartime service of Australians, even decades after the event. All Guts and No Glory is a soldier's account of the battle of Long Tan and the Viet Nam War, detailed and captivating right through to the return to Australia on the Vung Tau Ferry. It adds greatly to the records relating to this difficult, but important part of Australia's 20th century military heritage.' - Hon Tim Fischer MP

The Battle of Fromelles - until recently largely forgotten in the accounts of Australia’s experiences in World War One- remains the single bloodiest day in terms of numbers of soldiers killed, wounded or missing, in Australia’s military history. The battle now is also one of the most controversial military episodes in Australian history.

The battle for Fromelles was undoubtedly a tragedy – in the midst of a war which produced many such tragedies. Should anyone be blamed? Does finger pointing from the safety of 95 years distance add much to our understanding of the battle, the Western Front or the war itself? This book attempts to look at the battle, free from emotion, and place the course of events and the unfurling of the tragedy into its tactical, operational and strategic setting. This book is part of the Australian Army History Unit's Campaigns Series; well-researched, comprehensive and easy-to-read books on Australia's military campaigns.

What readers are saying, " I have received Roger Lee's book and I'm thrilled to have it! Thank you so much! It is so very carefully documented, extremely clear, and most helpful on what are in fact fuzzy areas such as : "Casualty Figures" or "The Trench". As for the information on the size and composition of : regiments, platoons, brigades, battalions, etc, the mind boggles! I had no idea it was so varied and complicated! In other words, the book opens up vast avenues of reflection and information, and I am learning heaps of things on every page. It's wonderfully pedagogical, and the lay-out is brilliant. It makes my experience in La Somme a hundred times richer. Hearty congratulations to Roger Lee!"


©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.