Battle of Crete

Big Sky Publishing
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Between 20 May and 1 June 1941 the Second World War came to the Greek island of Crete. The Commonwealth defenders consisted of Australian, New Zealand and British refugees from the doomed Greek Campaign who had not recovered from defeat.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Big Sky Publishing
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Published on
Dec 31, 2007
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Pages
178
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ISBN
9780980320411
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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