Measuring the Universe: Cosmic Dimensions from Aristarchus to Halley

University of Chicago Press
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Measuring the Universe is the first history of the evolution of cosmic dimensions, from the work of Eratosthenes and Aristarchus in the third century B.C. to the efforts of Edmond Halley (1656—1742).

"Van Helden's authoritative treatment is concise and informative; he refers to numerous sources of information, draws on the discoveries of modern scholarship, and presents the first book-length treatment of this exceedingly important branch of science."—Edward Harrison, American Journal of Physics

"Van Helden writes well, with a flair for clear explanation. I warmly recommend this book."—Colin A. Ronan, Journal of the British Astronomical Association
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About the author

Albert Van Helden is professor of history at Rice University and the author of The Invention of the Telescope.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Dec 15, 2010
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Pages
212
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ISBN
9780226848907
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Astronomy
Science / General
Science / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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