Poems and Ballads: Third series

Chatto & Windus
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Publisher
Chatto & Windus
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Published on
Dec 31, 1889
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Pages
181
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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A gifted poet, playwright, novelist, and critic, Algernon Charles Swinburne created late Victorian works that were controversial and groundbreaking, establishing his name as an imaginative innovator of his very own poetic forms, whilst achieving notoriety due to his scandalous lifestyle. The Delphi Poets Series offers readers the works of literature's finest poets, with superior formatting. This volume presents the complete poetical works and plays of Swinburne, with beautiful illustrations and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Swinburne's life and works
* Concise introductions to the poetry and other texts
* Images of how the poetry books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the poems
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry
* Easily locate the poems you want to read
* Features rare posthumous poems available nowhere else
* the complete verse dramas, with individual contents tables
* Includes Swinburne's only complete novel, LOVE’S CROSS-CURRENTS
- appearing here for the first time on eReaders
* Features Gosse’s seminal 1917 biography on the great poet, available in no other collection - discover Swinburne's literary life
* A selection of non-fiction
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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CONTENTS:

The Poetry Collections
ATALANTA IN CALYDON
POEMS AND BALLADS (FIRST SERIES)
SONGS OF TWO NATIONS
SONGS BEFORE SUNRISE
ERECHTHEUS
POEMS AND BALLADS (SECOND SERIES)
POEMS AND BALLADS. (THIRD SERIES)
SONGS OF THE SPRINGTIDES
STUDIES IN SONG
TRISTRAM OF LYONESSE
SONNETS
SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC POETS (1590-1650)
A MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY AND OTHER POEMS
A CENTURY OF ROUNDELS
ASTROPHEL AND OTHER POEMS
THE HEPTALOGIA
THE TALE OF BALEN
A CHANNEL PASSAGE AND OTHER POEMS
POSTHUMOUS AND UNCOLLECTED POEMS

The Poems
LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Verse Dramas
THE QUEEN MOTHER
ROSAMOND
CHASTELARD
BOTHWELL
MARY STUART
MARINO FALIERO
LOCRINE
THE SISTERS
ROSAMUND, QUEEN OF THE LOMBARDS
THE DUKE OF GANDIA

The Novel
LOVE’S CROSS-CURRENTS

Selected Non-Fiction
WILLIAM BLAKE: A CRITICAL ESSAY
THE AGE OF SHAKESPEARE

The Biography
THE LIFE OF ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE by Edmund Gosse

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In the year 1827, there died, after a long dim life of labour, a man as worthy of remark and regret as any then famous. In his time he had little enough of recognition or regard from the world; and now that here and there one man and another begin to observe that after all this one was perhaps better worth notice and honour than most, the justice comes as usual somewhat late.

Between 1757 and 1827 the world, one might have thought, had time to grow aware whether or not a man were worth something. For so long there lived and laboured in more ways than one the single Englishman of supreme and simple poetic genius born before the closing years of the eighteenth century; the one man of that date fit on all accounts to rank with the old great names. A man perfect in his way, and beautifully unfit for walking in the way of any other man. We have now the means of seeing what he was like as to face in the late years of his life: for his biography has at the head of it a clearly faithful and valuable likeness. The face is singular, one that strikes at a first sight and grows upon the observer; a brilliant eager, old face, keen and gentle, with a preponderance of brow and head; clear bird-like eyes, eloquent excitable mouth, with a look of nervous and fluent power; the whole lighted through as it were from behind with a strange and pure kind of smile, touched too with something of an impatient prospective rapture. The words clear and sweet seem the best made for it; it has something of fire in its composition, and something of music. If there is a want of balance, there is abundance of melody in the features; melody rather than harmony; for the mould of some is weaker and the look of them vaguer than that of others. Thought and time have played with it, and have nowhere pressed hard; it has the old devotion and desire with which men set to their work at starting. It is not the face of a man who could ever be cured of illusions; here all the medicines of reason and experience must have been spent in pure waste. We know also what sort of man he was at this time by the evidence of living friends. No one, artist or poet, of whatever school, who had any insight or any love of things noble and lovable, ever passed by this man without taking away some pleasant and exalted memory of him. Those with whom he had nothing in common but a clear kind nature and sense of what was sympathetic in men and acceptable in things—those men whose work lay quite apart from his—speak of him still with as ready affection and as full remembrance of his sweet or great qualities as those nearest and likest him. There was a noble attraction in him which came home to all people with any fervour or candour of nature in themselves. One can see, by the roughest draught or slightest glimpse of his face, the look and manner it must have put on towards children. He was about the hardest worker of his time; must have done in his day some horseloads of work. One might almost pity the poor age and the poor men he came among for having such a fiery energy cast unawares into the midst of their small customs and competitions. Unluckily for them, their new prophet had not one point they could lay hold of, not one organ or channel of expression by which to make himself comprehensible to such as they were. Shelley in his time gave enough of perplexity and offence; but even he, mysterious and rebellious as he seemed to most men, was less made up of mist and fire than Blake.

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