The Land Belongs To Me

Big Sky Publishing
Free sample

An inspirational rhyming tale about the importance of sharing, solving conflict and caring for our world.

The land is mine …

From the daisy to the tree …

Each and every flower …

Every twig belongs to me!

From the beetle to the general and the animals and people in between, every creature stakes a claim on the land … from the cities to the islands, to every rock, nook and cranny … But where can this lead? What will be left? Perhaps the wise worm has the answer.

A delight to read aloud!

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About the author

Alys’s poetry and short stories have appeared in magazines, anthologies and online journals across the world. In 2017, she received the Poetry Award at the Henry Lawson Festival of Arts and the Harold Goodwin Short Story Award. Her first picture book comes after years reflecting on her travels and sharing her stories and wisdom on her blog. Her website alysjackson.com is an accredited landing place for The Children’s University, an international charity aimed at providing innovative and engaging activities for children between the ages of 7 and 14.

Shane McGrath was born in Melbourne and has a brother and two sisters. His dad says he was named after a Hollywood cowboy. His mum says he was always talented (all mums say that) and one of the first artworks Shane made was when he bit his toast into the shape of a horse. He always loved drawing pictures and reading picture books, especially Where the Wild Things Are & Asterix comics. When at school, Shane would sometimes draw pictures of his teachers on the blackboard, which everyone found funny (except his teachers).

Shane grew up just over the Strait from Tasmania which he had heard all types of wild stories about. Until recently he had never visited, and quickly was impressed with it’s beautiful coastline, impressive mountains and it’s deep forests. He kept a sharp eye out for the Thylacine, but had no luck spotting one.

Shane enjoys drawing places and people from his childhood memories, and when a story is set before he was born he likes learning as much history about that time and it’s inhabitants. For Stripes in the Forest, Shane looked for as many images and films about the tigers and imagined what it must of been like to have lived that long ago on the island of Tasmania.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Big Sky Publishing
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Published on
Aug 1, 2019
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Pages
32
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ISBN
9781922265579
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / For children
Education / Early Childhood (incl. Preschool & Kindergarten)
Juvenile Fiction / Bedtime & Dreams
Juvenile Fiction / Family / General
Juvenile Fiction / General
Juvenile Fiction / School & Education
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

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This is a book of Russian folklore retold for young people and the young at heart. The tales are a good sampling of Slavic marchen. The stories in this book are those that Russian peasants tell their children and each other. This is a book written far away in Russia, for English children who play in deep lanes with wild roses above them in the high hedges, or by the small singing becks that dance down the gray fells at home. Russian fairyland is quite different. Under the windows of the author's house, the wavelets of the Volkhov River are beating quietly in the dusk. A gold light burns on a timber raft floating down the river. Beyond the river in the blue midsummer twilight is the broad Russian steppe and the distant forests of Novgorod. Somewhere in that forest of great trees--a forest so big that the forests of England are little woods beside it--is the hut where old Peter sits at night and tells these stories to his grandchildren. In Russia hardly anybody is too old for fairy stories, and the author even overheard soldiers on their way to the WWI talking of very wise and very beautiful princesses as they drank their tea by the side of the road. He believed there must be more fairy stories told in Russia than anywhere else in the world. In this book are a few of those he liked best. The author spent time in Russia during World War I as a journalist for the radical British newspaper, the Daily News, meeting among others, Lenin and Trotsky and was also known in the London bohemian artistic scene. 33% of the net from the sale of this book will be donated to charities for educational purposes. YESTERDAY'S BOOKS for TOMORROW'S EDUCATIONS
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The Maidu lived in the central Sierra Nevada of California, to the north of Yosemite. The Maidu, who were not particularly numerous to begin with, were decimated by the incursion of Europeans. These texts were collected by linguist, Roland B. Dixon at the begin- ning of the 20th century. In these texts Coyote is the central character. He is first seen in the company of Earth-Maker, giving him advice about how to build the world. The Maidu tales of Coyote are well known for being exceptionally transgressive; he is constantly seducing women by guile and deceit. While these stories are very entertaining, they shouldn't be taken to imply that this was normal behavior for Maidu. The trickster figure is an anti-hero, used as a way of defining the limits of what is acceptable. Of particular interest in Native American folklore is their Creation Myths. The volcano, Mount Lassen (also known as Lassen Peak), erupted often enough in prehistoric times to form the mountain, so it is little wonder the Indians in the northeast corner of California believed the world began there at the desire of a Great Man back when the earth resembled a molten mass. When it cooled, they believed that the deity made a woman to live with him, and from those two came all humans, including the Maidu. Wherever the truth lies, the Maidu Texts are an important part of Native American folklore and culture. So join with us and journey back to a time when these stories were told around campfires, to the delight of young and old alike. 33% of the net sale will be donated to the American Indian Education Fund.
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