Women's Writing in Twenty-First-Century France: Life as Literature

University of Wales Press
Free sample

Women’s Writing in Twenty-First Century France is a collection of critical essays on recent women-authored literature in France. It takes stock of the themes, issues and trends in women’s writing of the first decade of the twenty-first century, and it engages critically with the work of individual authors through close textual readings. Authors covered include major prizewinners, best-selling authors, established and new writers whose work attracts scholarly attention, including those whose texts have been translated into English such as Christine Angot, Nina Bouraoui, Marie Darrieussecq as Chloé Delaume, Claudie Gallay and Anna Gavalda. Themes include translation, popular fiction, society, history, war, family relations, violence, trauma, the body, racial identity, sexual identity, feminism, life-writing and textual/aesthetic experiments.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Wales Press
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Published on
Mar 15, 2013
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Pages
290
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ISBN
9781783160419
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / General
Literary Criticism / Women Authors
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Motherhood remains a complex and contested issue in feminist research as well as public discussion. This interdisciplinary volume explores cultural representations of motherhood in various contemporary European contexts, including France, Italy, Germany, Portugal, Spain, and the UK, and it considers how such representations affect the ways in which different individuals and groups negotiate motherhood as both institution and lived experience. It has a particular focus on literature, but it also includes essays that examine representations of motherhood in philosophy, art, social policy, and film. The book’s driving contention is that, through intersecting with other fields and disciplines, literature and the study of literature have an important role to play in nuancing dialogues around motherhood, by offering challenging insights and imaginative responses to complex problems and experiences. This is demonstrated throughout the volume, which covers a range of topics including: discursive and visual depictions of pregnancy and birth; the impact of new reproductive technologies on changing family configurations; the relationship between mothering and citizenship; the shaping of policy imperatives regarding mothering and disability; and the difficult realities of miscarriage, child death, violence, and infanticide. The collection expands and complicates hegemonic notions of motherhood, as the authors map and analyse shifting conceptions of maternal subjectivity and embodiment, explore some of the constraining and/or enabling contexts in which mothering takes place, and ask searching questions about what it means to be a ‘mother’ in Europe today. It will be of interest not only to those working in gender, women’s and feminist studies, but also to scholars in literary and cultural studies, and those researching in sociology, criminology, politics, psychology, medical ethics, midwifery, and related fields.
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