Lunch With a Bigot: The Writer in the World

Duke University Press
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To be a writer, Amitava Kumar says, is to be an observer. The twenty-six essays in Lunch with a Bigot are Kumar's observations of the world put into words. A mix of memoir, reportage, and criticism, the essays include encounters with writers Salman Rushdie and Arundhati Roy, discussions on the craft of writing, and a portrait of the struggles of a Bollywood actor. The title essay is Kumar's account of his visit to a member of an ultra-right Hindu organization who put him on a hit-list. In these and other essays, Kumar tells a broader story of immigration, change, and a shift to a more globalized existence, all the while demonstrating how he practices being a writer in the world.
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About the author

Amitava Kumar is Helen D. Lockwood Professor of English at Vassar College. He is the author of A Matter of Rats: A Short Biography of Patna, A Foreigner Carrying in the Crook of His Arm a Tiny Bomb, and Nobody Does the Right Thing, all also published by Duke University Press.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Apr 24, 2015
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9780822375395
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Literary
Literary Criticism / Books & Reading
Travel / Asia / India & South Asia
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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