Going Back: 16 Jewish women tell their life stories, and why they returned to Germany - the country that once wanted to kill them.

Clevo Books
Free sample

 Many of these women were still little girls when they were deported, forced underground or were still able to flee from Nazi Germany. They escaped with family, or all alone, and established new lives in South America, Shanghai, and what was then known as Palestine. And yet, eventually, they decided to go back to the country that wanted them dead. 16 Jewish women relate moving stories of their paths though life. 
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About the author

 Andrea von Treuenfeld studied journalism and German literature and spent many years working as a columnist, correspondent, and editor for such print media as Welt am Sonntag and Wirtschaftswoche. As a freelance journalist, she now writes portraits and biographies. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Clevo Books
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Published on
Jul 25, 2018
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9780997305210
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
Biography & Autobiography / Women
History / Europe / Germany
History / General
History / Holocaust
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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“The beautiful owner of this book is dearer to me than my life – August your protector.” This one sentence was the key to a mystery involving some of the greatest and most infamous figures in European history, from Frederick the Great to Napoleon and Hitler—and solved by the author of this book.

Eve Haas is the daughter of a German Jewish family that took refuge in London after Hitler came to power. Following a terrifying air raid in the blitz, her father revealed the family secret, that her great-great grandmother Emilie was married to a Prussian prince. He then showed her the treasured leather-bound notebook inscribed to Emilie by the prince. Her parents were reluctant to learn more, but later in life, when Eve was married and inherited the diary, she became obsessed with proving this birthright. The Secrets of the Notebook tells how she follows the clues, from experts on European royalty in London to archives in West Germany and then, under threat of being arrested as a spy by the Communist regime, to an archive in East Germany that had never before opened its doors to the West. What she unearths is a love story set against the upheaval of the Napoleonic wars and the antiSemitism of the Prussian court, and a ruse that both protected Emilie’s daughter and probably condemned her granddaughter—Eve’s beloved grandmother, Anna—to death in the Nazi camps.

When first published in the UK, The Secrets of the Notebook was an Irish Times bestseller. A movie based on the book is in production. 
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Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. 

In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the “Secret Annex” of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short.

Praise for The Diary of a Young Girl

“A truly remarkable book.”—The New York Times

“One of the most moving personal documents to come out of World War II.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer

“There may be no better way to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II than to reread The Diary of a Young Girl, a testament to an indestructible nobility of spirit in the face of pure evil.”—Chicago Tribune

“The single most compelling personal account of the Holocaust . . . remains astonishing and excruciating.”—The New York Times Book Review

“How brilliantly Anne Frank captures the self-conscious alienation and naïve self-absorption of adolescence.”—Newsday
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