The Blue Fairy Book - Illustrated by H. J. Ford and G. P. Jacomb Hood

Read Books Ltd
Free sample

The Blue Fairy Book – Illustrated by H. J. Ford – Volume I contains such classic fairy tales as, ‘East of the Sun, West of the Moon’, ‘The Yellow Dwarf’, ‘Little Red Riding Hood’, ‘Rumpelstiltzkin’, ‘Why the Sea is Salt’, ‘The White Cat’ and many more. This ‘Blue Book’ forms part of Andrew Lang’s ‘Coloured’ Fairy Books series – a series of twelve collections of fairy tales, published between 1889 and 1910. Each volume is distinguished by its own colour, and all in all, 437 tales from a wide array of cultures and countries are presented. Andrew Lang (1844 – 1912) was a Scots poet, novelist and literary critic, with a passion for folkloric story telling. Most of his volumes (including this, ‘The Blue Fairy Book’) were beautifully illustrated by Henry J. Ford (1860 – 1941), an inordinately talented artist who came to public attention with his illustrations for Lang. The books captured the imagination of British children, and later became worldwide bestsellers in the 1880s and 1890s.
Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Read Books Ltd
Read more
Published on
Jan 27, 2016
Read more
Pages
306
Read more
ISBN
9781473365285
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Fiction / Cultural Heritage
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Legends, Myths, Fables / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
This beloved volume collects the world’s most famous fairy tales, children’s classics, and bedtime stories.
 
The enchanting stories of childhood every girl and boy—and their parents—cherish are collected in this first volume of Andrew Lang’s renowned Fairy Books. Originally published in 1889, this treasure trove of timeless tales of action and adventure, enchanted forests and fantastic creatures, and monsters and magic has thrilled readers all over the world for generations.
 
The thirty-seven stories in this collection—including such favorites as “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Sleeping Beauty,” “Cinderella,” “Rumpelstiltskin,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “Hansel and Gretel,” “Puss in Boots,” “Aladdin,” and “Jack the Giant-Killer”—are more than just fairy tales; they are a priceless keepsake of childhood memories that will stand the test of time now and forever.
 
The Blue Fairy Book also includes “The Bronze Ring,” “Prince Hyacinth and the Dear Little Princess,” “East of the Sun and West of the Moon,” “The Yellow Dwarf,” “The Tale of a Youth Who Set Out to Learn What Fear Was,” “The Master-Maid,” “Why the Sea Is Salt,” “Felicia and the Pot of Pinks,” “The White Cat,” “The Water-Lily,” “The Gold-Spinners,” “The Terrible Head,” “The Story of Pretty Goldilocks,” “The History of Whittington,” “The Wonderful Sheep,” “Little Thumb,” “The Forty Thieves,” “Snow-White and Rose-Red,” “The Goose-Girl,” “Toads and Diamonds,” “Prince Darling,” “Blue Beard,” “Trusty John,” “The Brave Little Tailor,” “A Voyage to Lilliput,” “The Princess on the Glass Hill,” “The Story of Prince Ahmed and the Fairy Paribanou,” “The Black Bull of Norroway,” and “The Red Etin.”
Subject of this book - The last rally of Jacobitism hitherto obscure - Nature of the new materials - Information from spies, unpublished Stuart Papers, &c. - The chief spy - Probably known to Sir Walter Scott - ÔRedgauntletÕ cited - ÔPickle the SpyÕ - His position and services - The hidden gold of Loch Arkaig - Consequent treacheries - Character of Pickle - PickleÕs nephew - PickleÕs portrait - Pickle detected and denounced - To no purpose - Historical summary - Incognito of Prince Charles - Plan of this work.
The latest rally of Jacobitism, with its last romance, so faded and so tarnished, has hitherto remained obscure. The facts on which ÔWaverleyÕ is based are familiar to all the world: those on which ÔRedgauntletÕ rests were but imperfectly known even to Sir Walter Scott. The story of the Forty-five is the tale of Highland loyalty: the story of 1750-1763 is the record of Highland treachery, or rather of the treachery of some Highlanders. That story, now for the first time to be told, is founded on documents never hither to published, or never previously pieced together. The Additional Manuscripts of the British Museum, with relics of the government of Henry Pelham and his brother, the Duke of Newcastle, have yielded their secrets, and given the information of the spies. The Stuart Papers at Windsor (partly published in BrowneÕs ÔHistory of the Highland ClansÕ and by Lord Stanhope, but mainly virginal of type) fill up the interstices in the Pelham Papers like pieces in a mosaic, and reveal the general design. The letters of British ambassadors at Paris, Dresden, Berlin, Hanover, Leipzig, Florence, St. Petersburg, lend colour and coherence. The political correspondence of Frederick the Great contributes to the effect. A trifle of information comes from the French Foreign Office Archives; French printed ÔMŽmoiresÕ and letters, neglected by previous English writers on the subject, offer some valuable, indeed essential, hints, and illustrate CharlesÕs relations with the wits and beauties of the reign of Louis XV. By combining information from these and other sources in print, manuscript, and tradition, we reach various results. We can now follow and understand the changes in the singular and wretched development of the character of Prince Charles Edward Stuart. We get a curious view of the manners, and a lurid light on the diplomacy of the middle of the eighteenth century. We go behind the scenes of many conspiracies. Above all, we encounter an extraordinary personage, the great, highborn Highland chief who sold himself as a spy to the English Government.
His existence was suspected by Scott, if not clearly known and understood.
'Many a man,' says De Quincey, 'can trace his ruin to a murder, of which, perhaps, he thought little enough at the time.' This remark applies with peculiar force to Philip II. of Spain, to his secretary, Antonio Perez, to the steward of Perez, to his page, and to a number of professional ruffians. All of these, from the King to his own scullion, were concerned in the slaying of Juan de Escovedo, secretary of Philip's famous natural brother, Don John of Austria. All of them, in different degrees, had bitter reason to regret a deed which, at the moment, seemed a commonplace political incident.
The puzzle in the case of Escovedo does not concern the manner of his taking off, or the identity of his murderers. These things are perfectly well known; the names of the guilty, from the King to the bravo, are ascertained. The mystery clouds the motives for the deed. Why was Escovedo done to death? Did the King have him assassinated for purely political reasons, really inadequate, but magnified by the suspicious royal fancy? Or were the secretary of Philip II. and the monarch of Spain rivals in the affections of a one-eyed widow of rank? and did the secretary, Perez, induce Philip to give orders for Escovedo's death, because Escovedo threatened to reveal to the King their guilty intrigue? Sir William Stirling-Maxwell and Monsieur Mignet accepted, with shades of difference, this explanation. Mr. Froude, on the other hand, held that Philip acted for political reasons, and with the full approval of his very ill-informed conscience. There was no lady as a motive in the case, in Mr. Froude's opinion. A third solution is possible: Philip, perhaps, wished to murder Escovedo for political reasons, and without reference to the tender passion; but Philip was slow and irresolute, while Perez, who dreaded Escovedo's interference with his love affair, urged his royal master on to the crime which he was shirking. We may never know the exact truth, but at least we can study a state of morals and manners at Madrid, compared with which the blundering tragedies of Holyrood, in Queen Mary's time, seem mere child's play. The 'lambs' of Bothwell are lambs playful and gentle when set beside the instruments of Philip II.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.