The Mangle in Practice: Science, Society, and Becoming

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In The Mangle of Practice (1995), the renowned sociologist of science Andrew Pickering argued for a reconceptualization of research practice as a “mangle,” an open-ended, evolutionary, and performative interplay of human and non-human agency. While Pickering’s ideas originated in science and technology studies, this collection aims to extend the mangle’s reach by exploring its application across a wide range of fields including history, philosophy, sociology, geography, environmental studies, literary theory, biophysics, and software engineering.

The Mangle in Practice opens with a fresh introduction to the mangle by Pickering. Several contributors then present empirical studies that demonstrate the mangle’s applicability to topics as diverse as pig farming, Chinese medicine, economic theory, and domestic-violence policing. Other contributors offer examples of the mangle in action: real-world practices that implement a self-consciously “mangle-ish” stance in environmental management and software development. Further essays discuss the mangle as philosophy and social theory. As Pickering argues in the preface, the mangle points to a shift in interpretive sensibilities that makes visible a world of de-centered becoming. This volume demonstrates the viability, coherence, and promise of such a shift, not only in science and technology studies, but in the social sciences and humanities more generally.

Contributors: Lisa Asplen, Dawn Coppin, Adrian Franklin, Keith Guzik, Casper Bruun Jensen,Yiannis Koutalos, Brian Marick, Randi Markussen, Andrew Pickering, Volker Scheid, Esther-Mirjam Sent, Carol Steiner, Maxim Waldstein

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About the author

Andrew Pickering is a professor in the Department of Sociology and Philosophy at the University of Exeter. He is the author of The Mangle of Practice: Time, Agency, and Science and Constructing Quarks: A Sociological History of Particle Physics and the editor of Science as Practice and Culture.

Keith Guzik is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Bloomfield College in Bloomfield, New Jersey.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Jan 14, 2009
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9780822390107
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Environmental Science
Science / Essays
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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