Stretching the Sociological Imagination: Essays in Honour of John Eldridge

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This edited collection calls for renewed attention to the concept of the sociological imagination, allowing social scientists to link private issues to public troubles. Inspired by the eminent Glasgow-based sociologist, John Eldridge, it re-engages with the concept and shows how it can be applied to analyzing society today.
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About the author

John Eldridge, University of Glasgow, UK Huw Beynon, Cardiff University, UK Howard Davis, Bangor University, UK Matt Dawson, University of Glasgow, UK Tony Elger, University of Warwick, UK Bridget Fowler, University of Glasgow, UK John Holmwood, University of Nottingham, UK John MacInnes, University of Edinburgh, UK David Miller, University of Bath, UK Greg Philo, University of Glasgow, UK Andrew Smith, University of Glasgow, UK Tim Strangleman, University of Kent, UK Giuliana Tiripelli, University of Glasgow, UK Kevin Williams, Swansea University, UK Brian Winston, University of Lincoln, UK
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Nov 8, 2015
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Pages
277
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ISBN
9781137493644
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Labor
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Social Science / Media Studies
Social Science / Sociology / General
Social Science / Sociology of Religion
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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From the author of Aftershock and The Work of Nations, his most important book to date—a myth-shattering breakdown of how the economic system that helped make America so strong is now failing us, and what it will take to fix it.

Perhaps no one is better acquainted with the intersection of economics and politics than Robert B. Reich, and now he reveals how power and influence have created a new American oligarchy, a shrinking middle class, and the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity in eighty years. He makes clear how centrally problematic our veneration of the “free market” is, and how it has masked the power of moneyed interests to tilt the market to their benefit.

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From the Hardcover edition.
The educationally emaciated, suffering from intellectual and spiritual bilumia, binge on facts and linear thinking. The imprimatur of clarity and the infatuation with quantification are accoutrements of this affliction, often characterized by apathy. Chaos is introduced as the wrecking ball for the hierarchical skyscrapers that overcrowd the educational skyline. The type of chaos proposed can be explained by the neutron bomb analogy. Chaos destroys all that is inessential but leaves standing the essential and promotes holistic rather than compartmentalized learning. The authors further contend that one insight is better than a myriad of facts; in being vigilant of serendipity; that the value-aspect of facts is as important as the facts themselves. Such beliefs form a foundation for educational holism. Our goal is to popularize philosophy in the same way science has become popular without a mass understanding. Empiricism is criticized for creating the theoretical basis for fragmentation (forming the basis for an island ideology) by excising essence. Founded on inessential empirical ideology, efforts to teach multiculturalism merely exacerbate difference, promote alienation, and discourage tolerance. Within the framework of value hierarchies we favor, tolerance is not understood as open-armed acceptance of just anything, but the forbearance of an evil for the promise of greater good. Essence cannot be removed: even in the idiosyncratic we can find the essential. In the absence of chaotic methodology, critical thinking remains an apolitical, amoral, and atemporal process displaced from social and political reality. We propose a critical thinking that is not legalistic, but is action-oriented. The pipe dream for education is a political, moral, temporal, and decompartmentalized critical thinking that disseminates philosophy across the curriculum. Those who risk becoming pariahs and nomads are essential to the rejuvenation of the educational system.
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