Leopard in the Laboratory

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)
1
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Manjul finds a calf has been killed and people are saying that there is a leopard on the loose. While walking through the forest Manjul is cornered by the leopard. However, a mysterious man, Carpet Sahib, rescues her in the nick of time. In the aftermath of the incident, Manjul fears for the leopard.

Rohan arrives in Nainital for his summer holidays and the two of them discover that the cutting down of trees in the forest is driving the leopard into conflict with the villagers. Someone poisons the leopard’s kill and leaves it lying around, knowing that the big cat will eat it. The leopard does. The result is that Carpet Sahib and the two children have to come to the rescue of the big cat…with rather amazing results!

This is the second book in the Jim Corbett series.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI)
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Published on
Jun 2, 2016
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Pages
194
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ISBN
9788179933701
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Fiction / Animals / Lions, Tigers, Leopards, etc
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Citizen science enlists members of the public to make and record useful observations, such as counting birds in their backyards, watching for the first budding leaf in spring, or measuring local snowfall. The large numbers of volunteers who participate in projects such as Project FeederWatch or Project BudBurst collect valuable research data, which, when pooled together, create an enormous body of scientific data on a vast geographic scale. In return, such projects aim to increase participants' connections to science, place, and nature, while supporting science literacy and environmental stewardship. In Citizen Science, experts from a variety of disciplines—including scientists and education specialists working at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, where many large citizen science programs use birds as proxies for biodiversity—share their experiences of creating and implementing successful citizen science projects, primarily those that use massive data sets gathered by citizen scientists to better understand the impact of environmental change.

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