A DOZEN AT A BLOW - an Old European Folktale: Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 44

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 44

 

In Issue 44 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the old European tale of the tailor who through guile and cunning eventually wins the hand of a Princess. Download and read the story to find out the details of just how he achieved his feats.

 

This issue also has a "Where in the World - Look it Up" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Apr 22, 2016
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Pages
23
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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This is a book of Russian folklore retold for young people and the young at heart. The tales are a good sampling of Slavic marchen. The stories in this book are those that Russian peasants tell their children and each other. This is a book written far away in Russia, for English children who play in deep lanes with wild roses above them in the high hedges, or by the small singing becks that dance down the gray fells at home. Russian fairyland is quite different. Under the windows of the author's house, the wavelets of the Volkhov River are beating quietly in the dusk. A gold light burns on a timber raft floating down the river. Beyond the river in the blue midsummer twilight is the broad Russian steppe and the distant forests of Novgorod. Somewhere in that forest of great trees--a forest so big that the forests of England are little woods beside it--is the hut where old Peter sits at night and tells these stories to his grandchildren. In Russia hardly anybody is too old for fairy stories, and the author even overheard soldiers on their way to the WWI talking of very wise and very beautiful princesses as they drank their tea by the side of the road. He believed there must be more fairy stories told in Russia than anywhere else in the world. In this book are a few of those he liked best. The author spent time in Russia during World War I as a journalist for the radical British newspaper, the Daily News, meeting among others, Lenin and Trotsky and was also known in the London bohemian artistic scene. 33% of the net from the sale of this book will be donated to charities for educational purposes. YESTERDAY'S BOOKS for TOMORROW'S EDUCATIONS

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 146

 

In this 146th story in the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Manx fairy tale of Kitty Kerush and her fairy lover Udereek. Udereek comes across Kitty sewing and spinning in her garden and is so enraptured that he returns every day, eventually falling in love with her. So enamoured he can no longer keep his presence and his love a secret and he reveals himself. In time Kitty, too, falls in love with Udereek. But their love for one another is doomed.……. Download and read this story to find out exactly why their love is doomed and what happened when the Fairy King finds out about where and with whom Udereek has been spending his time.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map.

HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through the Middle East and  Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, can be altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 100

In this the 100th issue of the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates one of the most famous German fairytales - “Hansel and Grettel”

 

Hansel and Grettel’s mother has died leaving their poor woodcutter father to bring them up. Because he is out of the house all day he really cannot care for them, so makes a marriage of convenience with a widow from a nearby village. But is the marriage so convenient after all?

 

The woman turns out to be mean and nasty and with money in short supply, the widow suggests to the woodcutter leaving Hansel and Grettel in the forest so there would be more to go around. But she would, wouldn’t she. After all they’re not her children…….

 

The woodcutter reluctantly agrees. Twice he tries but cannot leave his young children to fend for themselves against the elements. However, the mean wife forces his hand on the third attempt and Hansel and Grettel are left to take care of themselves.

 

But does the whole situation turn out as bad as it sounds?

You’re invited to download and read the whole story of Hansel and Grettel and their escapades with the witch of the forest.

 

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN'S STORIES FOR ONLY $1 

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story.

HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 300

In this 300th  issue of the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the French Fairy Tale – “THE RIDICULOUS WISHES”.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away there lived a poor woodcutter who life very hard. Indeed, it was his lot to toil for little guerdon, and although he was young and happily married there were moments when he wished himself dead and below ground.

One day while at his work he was again lamenting his fate.

"Some men," he said, "have only to make known their desires, and straightway these are granted, and their every wish fulfilled; but it has availed me little to wish for ought, for the gods are deaf to the prayers of such as I."

As he spoke these words there was a great noise of thunder, and Jupiter appeared before him wielding his mighty thunderbolts. Our poor man was stricken with fear and threw himself on the ground.

"My lord," he said, "forget my foolish speech; heed not my wishes, but cease thy thundering!"

"Have no fear," answered Jupiter; "I have heard thy plaint, and have come hither to show thee how greatly thou dost wrong me. Hark! I, who am sovereign lord of this world, promise to grant in full the first three wishes which it will please thee to utter, whatever these may be. Consider well what things can bring thee joy and prosperity, and as thy happiness is at stake, be not over-hasty, but resolve the matter in thy mind."

Having thus spoken Jupiter withdrew himself and made his ascent to Olympus. As for our woodcutter, he blithely corded his faggot, and throwing it over his shoulder, made for his home.

Well, what were the first three wishes the woodcutter made? Were they wise and well thought out or did he wish out of anger and revenege?

Download and read this story to find out, and look for the moral at the end.

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN’S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

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