A LITTLE BRAVE AND THE MEDICINE WOMAN - A Lakota, Sioux Folk Tale: Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 70

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 70

 

In Issue 70 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Lakota, Sioux tale of strange goings on around the grave of a long-dead Medicine woman. He takes a few boys to show them where the grave is when pandemonium breaks loose. Download and read the story to find out what happened.

 

Each issue also has a "Where in the World - Look it Up" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Apr 27, 2016
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Pages
15
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Juvenile Fiction / Legends, Myths, Fables / Native American
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Anon E Mouse

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 100

In this the 100th issue of the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates one of the most famous German fairytales - “Hansel and Grettel”

 

Hansel and Grettel’s mother has died leaving their poor woodcutter father to bring them up. Because he is out of the house all day he really cannot care for them, so makes a marriage of convenience with a widow from a nearby village. But is the marriage so convenient after all?

 

The woman turns out to be mean and nasty and with money in short supply, the widow suggests to the woodcutter leaving Hansel and Grettel in the forest so there would be more to go around. But she would, wouldn’t she. After all they’re not her children…….

 

The woodcutter reluctantly agrees. Twice he tries but cannot leave his young children to fend for themselves against the elements. However, the mean wife forces his hand on the third attempt and Hansel and Grettel are left to take care of themselves.

 

But does the whole situation turn out as bad as it sounds?

You’re invited to download and read the whole story of Hansel and Grettel and their escapades with the witch of the forest.

 

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN'S STORIES FOR ONLY $1 

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story.

HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

Anon E Mouse

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 120

 

In issue 120 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Romanian tale of Vasilica the Brave. Vasilica did not know the meaning of fear, and was calm and cool in the greatest peril; he laughed at ill the frightful tales of dragons and evil spirits recounted by the old women of the neighbourhood. So he was called Vasilica the Brave.

His father, seeing that he was not diligent at learning, either his own trade, or any other, thought it best that he should become a soldier. But the boy did not wish to be placed under the command of others, for with his strength he could overcome them all. On leaving home he comes across a dragon fighting a winged horse. He helps the winged horse escape the dragon’s torment and a legend is born. .....…… Download and read about the adventures and conquests of Vasilica and his horse.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

Anon E Mouse
Anon E Mouse
What is a Saga? A Saga is a story, or telling in prose, sometimes mixed with verse. There are many kinds of Sagas with varying degrees of truth. There are the mythical Sagas, the historical Sagas of the kings of Norway, and then there are Sagas relating to Iceland narrating the lives, the feuds and the ends of mighty chiefs who dwelt in the districts of the island. These were told by men who lived on the very spot, and told with an exactness as to time and place. The Saga of Njal is one of these. Of all the Sagas relating to Iceland, this tragic story bears away the palm for truthfulness and beauty. To use the words of one well qualified to judge, it is, when compared with all similar compositions, as gold to brass. In this Saga we learn of the sad story of Njal's fate, Gunnar's peerlessness and Hallgerda's infamy, of Bergthora's helpfulness, of Skarphedinn's hastiness, of Flosi's foul deed, and Kari's stern revenge. To tell a story truthfully was what was looked for from all men in those days; but to tell it properly and gracefully, and to clothe the facts in fitting diction, was given to few, and of those few the Saga teller who first threw Njal into its present shape, was one of the first and foremost. As for truthfulness, there are many other Sagas relating to the same period in which the actors in our Saga are mentioned by name and in which their deeds are corroborated. But, of all the Sagas, none were so interesting as Njal, whether as regarding the length of the story, the number of ranking chiefs who appeared in it as actors and the graphic way in which the tragic tale is told.
Anon E Mouse
A GREAT READ FOR YOUNG PRINCES, PRINCESSES and THOSE WHO LOVE ADVENTURER!

These two books are a treasure chest of 76 classic Gypsy Folk Tales and Stories, and makes fascinating reading for those interested in folklore in general, but especially for those interested in the original Roma, or Gypsy, people.

Two unique volumes of Gypsy tales full of Gypsy mischief, adventure and romance containing 76 unique Gypsy folk tales from Turkey, Romania, Bukowina, Transylvania, Slovakia, Moravia, Bohemia, Poland, England, Wales and Scotland.

In book one you will find stories from Turkish, Romanian and Bukowina Gypsies and in book two tales from from Transylvania, Slovakia, Moravia, Bohemia, Poland, England, Wales and Scotland.


In book 2 you will find tales like The Vampire, The Gypsy and the Priest, Baldplate, The Deluded Dragon, The Jealous Husband, The Creation of the Violin, The Three Girls, Bobby Rag, De Little Fox, the Old Smith, The Princess and the Forester's Son and many, many more.

Francis Hindes Groome collated and published this collection in 1899, making only few changes and remaining true to the original stories, so to let the written story enchant us as if it were being told in the vernacular. 

The stories are further enhanced by the numerous impressive black and white and colour illustrations recently completed by Maggie Gunzel the Dutch artist and illustrator who, unlike many illustrators of the 19th C. and 20th C, has stayed true to the subject matter.

A percentage of the net sale from this book will be donated to the RELIEF FUND FOR ROMANIA.

See the book's webpage for a full list of the 76 tales in this exquisite volume.

Anon E Mouse
This volume contains twenty-three ursgeuln, or tales, plus a number of fables from the Western Highlands of Scotland. Tales like“THE YOUNG KING OF EASAIDH RUADH”, “THE BATTLE OF THE BIRDS”, “THE TALE OF THE HOODIE”, “THE SEA-MAIDEN” and many more.

 

These are tales and stories in which something 'Fairy' or magical occurs, something extraordinary--fairies, giants, dwarfs, speaking animals, or simply the remarkable stupidity of some of the characters. But these aren't just a collection of amusing and entertaining stories. In the days before schools these are the tales that were used to teach the lessons of life. The story of MURCHAG A'S MIONACHAG, for example, is legendary among the Gaelic tales. It is the infant ladder to learning about the chain of cause and effect, and fully as sensible as any of its kind. It used to be commonly taught to children of five or six years of age, and repeated by school boys, and was often recalled by grownups in all parts of the Highlands. 

So take some time out and travel back to a period before television and radio, a time when tales were passed on orally--at the drying kilns, at the communal well or in homes, where families would gather around a crackling and spitting hearth and granddad or grandma or uncle or auntie would delight and captivate the gathering with stories passed on to them from their parents and grandparents from time immemorial. 

A proportion of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities, schools and special causes.

Anon E Mouse
THE following translation was undertaken from a desire to lay before the English-speaking people the full treasury of epical beauty, folklore, and mythology comprised in The Kalevala (the Land of Heroes, the national epic of the Finns.) The Kalevala describes Finnish nature very minutely and very beautifully. 

Grimm says that no poem is to be compared with it in this respect. A deeper and more esoteric meaning of the Kalevala, however, points to a contest between Light and Darkness. The numerous myths of the poem are likewise full of significance and beauty, and the Kalevala should be read between the lines, in order that the full meaning of this great epic may be comprehended. 

The whole poem is replete with the most fascinating folk-lore about the mysteries of nature, the origin of things, the enigmas of human tears, and, true to the character of a national epic, it represents not only the poetry, but the entire wisdom and accumulated experience of a nation. 

One of the most notable characteristics of the Finnish mythology is the interdependence among the gods. The Finnish deities, like the ancient gods of Italy and Greece, are generally represented in pairs. They have their individual abodes and are surrounded by their respective families. The Sun and the Moon each have a consort, and sons and daughters. Only two sons of Paeivae appear in The Kalevala, one comes to aid of Wainamoinen in his efforts to destroy the mystic Fire-fish, by throwing from the heavens to the girdle of the hero, a "magic knife, silver-edged, and golden-handled;" the other son, Panu, the Fire-child, brings back to Kalevala the fire that bad been stolen by Louhi, the wicked hostess of Pohyola. 

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

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