A TALE OF TONTLAWALD - An Estonian Fairy Tale: Baba Indaba Children's Stories - Issue 88

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 88

 

In Issue 88 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Estonian tale of Tontlawald (Tontla Forest or Tontla Woods.) The story goes thus, a peasant had remarried, and he and his new wife quarreled, and she abused her stepdaughter Elsa. One day, the children were gathering strawberries when a boy realised they had wandered in to Tontlawald; the rest ran off, but Elsa did not think the woods could be worse than her stepmother. She met a little black dog with a silver collar, and a maiden dressed in silk who asked her to stay and be her friend….. Download and read the stories to find out just what happened after that.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
May 3, 2016
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Pages
37
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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THE STORIES in this collection were recorded from the lips of over sixty negro story-tellers in the remote country districts of Jamaica during two visits to the island in the summer of 1919 and the winter of 1921. The role of Anansi, the trickster spider, is akin to the Native American Coyote and the (Southern African) Bantu Hare.

 

Herein you will find 149 Anansi tales and a further 18 Witticisms. The stories are categorised into Animal Stories, Old Stories (chiefly of sorcery), Dance and Song and Witticisms. You will find stories as varied in title and content as “The Fish-Basket”, “The Storm“, “The King's Two Daughters”, “The Gub-Gub Peas”, “Simon Tootoos”, “The Tree-Wife” and many, many more unique tales.

 

In some instances, Martha Warren Beckwith was able to record musical notation to accompany the stories. As such you will find these scattered throughout the book. In this way the original style of the story-telling, which in some instances mingles story, song and dance, is as nearly as possible preserved.

 

Two influences have dominated story-telling in Jamaica, the first an absorbing interest in the magical effect of song which far surpasses that in the action of the story; the second, the conception of the spider Anansi as the trickster hero among a group of animal figures. "Anansi stories" regularly form the entertainment during wake-nights, and it is difficult not to believe that the vividness with which these animal actors take part in the story springs from the idea that they really represent the dead in the underworld whose spirits have the power, according to the native belief, of taking animal form. In the local culture, magic songs are often used in communicating with the

dead, and the obeah-man who sets a ghost upon an enemy often sends it in the form of some animal; hence there are animals which must be carefully handled lest they be something other than they appear. The importance of animal stories is further illustrated by the fact that animal stories form the greater part of this volume.

 

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to Sentebale, a charity supporting children orphaned by AIDS in Lesotho.

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