BABA YAGA AND THE LITTLE GIRL WITH THE KIND HEART - A Russian Fairy Tale: Baba Indaba Children's Stories - Issue 85

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 85

 

In Issue 85 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Russian tale of “Baba Yaga and the Girl with a Kind Heart”. A while after the death of his wife,  poor peasant farmer decides to marry again, if only to give his daughter a mother. This he does but when he is out working in the fields and in the forest, all is not well at home.

Download and read the story to find out just what was going on.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
May 3, 2016
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Pages
35
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Enter the Grishaverse with Book One of the Shadow and Bone Trilogy by the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom.

Soldier. Summoner. Saint. Orphaned and expendable, Alina Starkov is a soldier who knows she may not survive her first trek across the Shadow Fold—a swath of unnatural darkness crawling with monsters. But when her regiment is attacked, Alina unleashes dormant magic not even she knew she possessed.

Now Alina will enter a lavish world of royalty and intrigue as she trains with the Grisha, her country’s magical military elite—and falls under the spell of their notorious leader, the Darkling. He believes Alina can summon a force capable of destroying the Shadow Fold and reuniting their war-ravaged country, but only if she can master her untamed gift.

As the threat to the kingdom mounts and Alina unlocks the secrets of her past, she will make a dangerous discovery that could threaten all she loves and the very future of a nation.

Welcome to Ravka . . . a world of science and superstition where nothing is what it seems.

A New York Times Bestseller
A Los Angeles Times Bestseller
An Indie Next List Book
This title has Common Core connections.

Praise for the Grishaverse

“A master of fantasy.” —The Huffington Post
“Utterly, extremely bewitching.” —The Guardian
“The best magic universe since Harry Potter.” —Bustle
“This is what fantasy is for.” —The New York Times Book Review
“[A] world that feels real enough to have its own passport stamp.” —NPR
“The darker it gets for the good guys, the better.” —Entertainment Weekly
“Sultry, sweeping and picturesque. . . . Impossible to put down.” —USA Today
“There’s a level of emotional and historical sophistication within Bardugo’s original epic fantasy that sets it apart.” —Vanity Fair
“Unlike anything I’ve ever read.” —Veronica Roth, bestselling author of Divergent
“Bardugo crafts a first-rate adventure, a poignant romance, and an intriguing mystery!” —Rick Riordan, bestselling author of the Percy Jackson series
“This is a great choice for teenage fans of George R.R. Martin and J.R.R. Tolkien.” ?RT Book Reviews
Read all the books in the Grishaverse!

The Shadow and Bone Trilogy
(previously published as The Grisha Trilogy)
Shadow and Bone
Siege and Storm
Ruin and Rising

The Six of Crows Duology
Six of Crows
Crooked Kingdom

The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

This is the 10th Fairy Books of Many Colours compiled and edited by Andrew Lang. The stories in all the books are borrowed from many countries – Australia, North America, Southern Africa, New Caledonia located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, Persia, Northern Europe, India, South America and beyond.

However much these nations differ about trifles, they all agree in liking fairy tales. Herein you will find 32 illustrated fairy tales like What the Rose did to the Cypress, The Bunyip, The Story of the Yara, The Cunning Hare, The Turtle and his Bride, The Sacred Milk of Koumongoé, The Wicked Wolverine, The Elf Maiden, Asmund and Signy and many, many more.

The stories are further enhanced by 8 coloured plates, 22 full-page pen and ink drawings and 21 In Text sketches by H. J. Ford.
This book contains many references to fairies. As to whether there are really any fairies or not, is a difficult question.  Andrew Lang never saw any himself, but he knew several people who have seen them-in the Highlands - and heard their music.  So, if ever you are near Nether Lochaber, go to the Fairy Hill, and you may hear the music your-self, but you must go on a fine day……

TABLE of CONTENTS
What the Rose did to the Cypress
Ball-Carrier and the Bad One
How Ball-Carrier finished his Task
The Bunyip
Father Grumbler
The Story of the Yara
The Cunning Hare
The Turtle and his Bride
How Geirald the Coward was Punished
Hábogi
How the Little Brother set Free his Big Brothers
The Sacred Milk of Koumongoé
The Wicked Wolverine
The Husband of the Rat’s Daughter
The Mermaid and the Boy
Pivi and Kabo
The Elf Maiden
How Some Wild Animals became Tame Ones
Fortune and the Wood-Cutter
The Enchanted Head
The Sister of the Sun
The Prince and the Three Fates
The Fox and the Lapp
Kisa the Cat
The Lion and the Cat
Which was the Foolishest?
Asmund and Signy
Rübezahl
Story of the King who would be Stronger than Fate
Story of Wali Dâd the Simple-hearted
Tale of a Tortoise and of a Mischievous Monkey
The Knights of the Fish

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 161

 

In this 161st issue of the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Irish tale of “The Adventures of Gilla Na Chreck An Gour”, a story from Wexford, Ireland. Tom is the son of a poor widow and achieves what he sets his mind to. At that time the  King of Dublin's daughter was so melancholy that she hadn’t laughed for seven years. Her father was so concerned he said he would grant her in marriage to whoever could make her laugh three times. "That's the very thing for me to try," says Tom; and so, without burning any more daylight, he kissed his mother and off he set along the yalla highroad to the town of Dublin......……. Did he succeed or didn’t he? Download and read this story to find out what happened to Tom and about the adventures he had along the way.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story.

HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through the Middle East and Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, can be altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

Nobody knows how old the stories in this classic volume are, or who told them first. Noah’s grandchildren, the children of Ham, Shem and Japhet may have listened to them on the Ark. Hector's little boy may have heard them in the City of Troy, but it is certain that Homer knew them, and that some of them were written down in Egypt at about the time of Moses.

Herein are 32 tales from the 1001 Arabian Nights compiled by Andrew Lang in which heroic figures such as Aladdin, Ali Baba, Sinbad, and others, whose luck and ingenuity carry them through perilous adventures. These were usually quests set by rulers, in which a young man was set a number of challenges to prove his mettle. Others adventures were the daring rescues of Princesses by valiant knights on white chargers - what else? Whatever the reason, the adventures and escapades in far-flung places will keep young readers enthralled for hours. The 65 illustrations by H. J. Ford give the stories added depth and meaning.

As always, there are plenty of kings and queens, princes and princesses in these fairy tales, just because long ago there were plenty of kings in most countries. Now 'The Arabian Nights,' some of which, but not nearly all, are given in this volume, are only a sliver of the fairy tales of the East. The people of Asia, Arabia, and Persia told them in their own way, not only for children, but for grown-up people. There were no novels back then, nor any printed books, and definitely no internet or tablet PCs. But there were people whose profession it was to entertain and amuse men, women and children by telling tales. They travelled the country, from village to village, and told their stories, dressed them up and made the characters good Muslims, Hindus and Jews, living in Persia, Arabia or India.

NOTE: I can remember reading 'The Arabian Nights' when I was six years old, in dirty yellow old volumes of small type with no pictures, and I hope children who read them with Mr. Ford's pictures will be as happy as I was then in the company of Aladdin and Sindbad the Sailor.
Andrew Lang


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