THE MYTH OF MANO CCAPAC - An Inca Legend: Baba Indaba Children's Stories Issue 72

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 72

In Issue 72 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Inca legends of Mano Ccapac, the original supreme Inca, and his sister-wife, Mama Oullo Huaca, sent to earth for the purpose of instructing the degraded peoples in the arts of civilised life.How did they do this? Well you’ll have to download and read the story to find out what happened.

 

Each issue also has a "Where in the World - Look it Up" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE DOWNLOADS

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Apr 28, 2016
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Pages
15
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Anon E Mouse

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 122

 

In issue 122 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the ancient Egyptian tale of the story of Osiris. In the beginning the sun god Ra cursed Nut, and his curse was that none of her children should be born on any day of any year. But Nut finds a way and Osiris was born on the first day, Horus on the second, Set on the third, Isis on the fourth, and Nephthys on the fifth. This is the story of Osiris.......…… Download and read this ancient story of the Egyptian deities.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

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Anon E Mouse

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 144

 

In this 144th story in the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the the fairy tale of a kite that went to the moon - when it wasn’t meant to. A boy makes the biggest kite in the village and a friend paints the moon on it – but it won’t fly during the day. ……. Download and read this story to find out exactly why the lite won’t fly when the sun is shining. An just what is on the others side of the moon and does anyone really live there?

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map.

HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through the Middle East and  Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, can be altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

Baba Indaba,Childrens,Folklore,Fairy,Tales,bedtime story,legends,moon,kite,flew,fly,dark side of the moon,lady of the moon,baby

 

Anon E Mouse
Anon E. Mouse

Herein you will find 20 tales, from the Emerald Isle. There are seven bardic romances like, The Children of Lir, The Secret Of Labra, The Vengeance Of Mesgedra and five more besides. Also contained herein are thirteen legends, each a tale in itself, tracing the life of Finn mac Cumhal from boyhood through adulthood including the The Birth Of Oisín and his Visit To The Land Of Youth only to return to find that his father, Finn, had fallen at the battle of Brea three hundred years before. Lastly, The History Of King Cormac is recounted from the time of his birth, his judgement, marriage, disappearance and his death.

 

The 16 Georgian style, color plates by Stephen Reid (1873 – 1948) portray scenes from these tales and are exquisite and sumptuous in their color and detail.

 

The two most conspicuous figures in ancient Irish legend are Cuchulain, who lived in the reign of Conor mac Nessa immediately before the Christian era, and Finn son of Cumhal, who appears in literature as the captain of a military order devoted to the service of the High King of Ireland during the 3rd century. As such, this volume is mainly concerned with the exploits of Fin mac Cumhal and the Fianna of Erinn.

 

The romantic tales retold here belong neither to the category of folk-lore nor of myth, although most contain elements of both. They belong to the bardic literature of ancient Ireland, a literature written with an artistic purpose by men who possessed in the highest degree the native culture of their land and time.

 

Once again, you’re invited to curl up with a unique piece of ancient Irish folklore and let the Gift of the Irish enchant and captivate you. This volume has not been seen in print for over one hundred years—don’t miss this golden opportunity.

 

TAGS: High Deeds Of Finn, Bardic Romances, Ancient Ireland,  Children Of Lir, Quest, Sons Of Turenn, Secret Of Labra, King Iubdan, King Fergus, Carving Of Mac Datho's Boar, Vengeance Of Mesgedra, Story Of Etain And Midir, How Ethne Quitted Fairyland, Boyhood Of Finn Maccumhal, Coming Of Finn, Finns Chief Men, Tale Of Vivionn The Giantess,  Chase Of The Gilla Dacar, Birth Of Oisín, Oisín In The Land Of Youth, History Of King Cormac, Birth Of Cormac, Judgement Of Cormac, Marriage Of King Cormac, Instructions Of The King, Cormac Sets Up The First Mill In Erinn, Pleasant Story Of Cormac's Brehon, Judgement Concerning Cormac's Sword, Disappearance Of Cormac, Description Of Cormac, Death And Burial Of Cormac, celtic folklore, celtic fairytales, celtic myths, celtic legends, childrens stories, Irish myths, Irish legends, Irish folklore, Irish tales

Anon E. Mouse

Nowhere in the whole realm of literature will you find such a Marvel, such a Wonder, such a Nonesuch of a book; nowhere will you find impossibilities so real and so convincing than in the Tales of a Thousand and One nights, also known as the Tales from the Arabian Nights. The scene is Indian, Egyptian, Arabian, Persian; but Bagdad and Balsora, Grand Cairo, the silver Tigris and the golden Euphrates, and the blooming gardens of Damascus, though they can be found indeed on the map, live much more truly in the enchanted realms of these tales.

 

Herein you will find eleven of the most popular tales of the Arabian Nights, taken from the original two hundred and sixty four, with color illustrations by Maxfield Parrish. Here you will find

Tales and stories of The Talking Bird,

The Singing Tree and The Golden Water,

The Story of The Fisherman and the Genie,

The History of the Young King of the Black Isles,

The Story of Gulnare of the Sea,

The Story of Aladdin; or, The Wonderful Lamp,

The Story of Prince Agib,

The Story of the City Of Brass,

The Story of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,

The History of Codadad and His Brothers and

The Seven Voyages Of Sinbad the Sailor.

 

Once a child has once read of Prince Agib, of Gulnare or Periezade, Sinbad or Codadad, in this or any other volume of its kind, the magic will have been instilled into their blood forever, for the Oriental flavour in the Arab tales is like nothing so much as magic.

 

NOTE: The editors have purposely shortened the stories so as to keep a child’s attention, omitting some of the tedious repetitions that creep in from time to time when Arabian story-tellers were embellishing the text to suit their purposes.

 

TAGS: The Arabian Nights, 11 best known stories, Talking Bird, Singing Tree, and The Golden Water, Story of The Fisherman and the Genie, History of the Young King of the Black Isles, Story of Gulnare of the Sea, Story of Aladdin; Wonderful Lamp, Story of Prince Agib, Story of the City Of Brass, Story of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, History of Codadad and His Brothers, Seven Voyages Of Sinbad the Sailor, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Nora A. Smith, Illustrated, Maxfield Parrish, folklore, fairy tales, myths, legends, children’s stories, magic, wonder, enchantment, Nonesuch of a book, one thousand and one nights, Indian, Egyptian, Arabian, Persian; Bagdad, Balsora, Grand Cairo, silver Tigris, golden Euphrates, gardens of Damascus,

Anon E. Mouse
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