THE RISE AND FALL OF THE TOLTEC EMPIRE - An ancient Mexican folktale

Baba Indaba Children's Stories

Book 73
Abela Publishing Ltd
Free sample

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 73

In this 73rd story from Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the story of the founding of the Toltec empire in 566AD to it?s fall four hundred years later..........?? Download and read this interesting story, rewritten and shortened for children which tells of good intentionsÿ and what happens when rulers become corrupt.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

Baba Indaba,Childrens,Folklore,Fairy,Tales,bedtime story,legends,Toltec,Mexico,rise,fall

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Jul 3, 2016
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Pages
20
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
History / Latin America / Central America
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Anthologies
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 77

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In Issue 77 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates an old Scottish riddle used to teach children. It goes something like this?..in Scotland, there was a custom once through the G‘ldom, when a man would die, that the whole people of the place would gather together to the house in which the dead man was called Tigh aire faire (the shealing of watching, now better known as a wake), and they would be at drinking, and singing, and telling tales, till the white day should come.

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At this time they were gathered together in the house of watching, and there was a man in this house, and when the tale went about, he had neither tale nor song, and as he had not, he was put out at the door. When he was put out he stood at the end of the barn; he was afraid to go farther. He was but a short time standing when a number of apparitions passed him by. When he asked an old woman for an explanation, he was left even more perplexed?? So what was so mystifying about the apparitions and the explanation he received? Well you'll just have to download and read the story to find out what went on.

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INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

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Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

ÿ

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 300

In this 300th ÿissue of the Baba Indaba?s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the French Fairy Tale ? ?THE RIDICULOUS WISHES?.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away there lived a poor woodcutter who life very hard. Indeed, it was his lot to toil for little guerdon, and although he was young and happily married there were moments when he wished himself dead and below ground.

One day while at his work he was again lamenting his fate.

"Some men," he said, "have only to make known their desires, and straightway these are granted, and their every wish fulfilled; but it has availed me little to wish for ought, for the gods are deaf to the prayers of such as I."

As he spoke these words there was a great noise of thunder, and Jupiter appeared before him wielding his mighty thunderbolts. Our poor man was stricken with fear and threw himself on the ground.

"My lord," he said, "forget my foolish speech; heed not my wishes, but cease thy thundering!"

"Have no fear," answered Jupiter; "I have heard thy plaint, and have come hither to show thee how greatly thou dost wrong me. Hark! I, who am sovereign lord of this world, promise to grant in full the first three wishes which it will please thee to utter, whatever these may be. Consider well what things can bring thee joy and prosperity, and as thy happiness is at stake, be not over-hasty, but resolve the matter in thy mind."

Having thus spoken Jupiter withdrew himself and made his ascent to Olympus. As for our woodcutter, he blithely corded his faggot, and throwing it over his shoulder, made for his home.

Well, what were the first three wishes the woodcutter made? Were they wise and well thought out or did he wish out of anger and revenege?

Download and read this story to find out, and look for the moral at the end.

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN?S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

ÿ

The 48  Folk-Tales in this book hail from the South East Asian land-locked country of Laos.

Herein are stories like The Enchanted Mountain, The Spirit-Guarded Cave, The Monkeys and the Crabs, The Origin of Lightning (a tale which seems to be endemic amongst all the world’s cultures,) The Faithful Husband, The Cheating Priest and many more children’s stories which cover Romance and Tragedy, Temples and Priests, Moderation and Greed, Parables and Proverbs and The Wonders of Wisdom. There is also a small collection of Stories which went Astray.

 

When these were first gathered by Katherine Neville Fleeson, the country was a part of the kingdom of Siam, and are uniquely South East Asian in their charm and complete novelty. Until the translator of this volume collected these stories, they were even unwritten, with a single exception which was found in an ancient Laos manuscript. They are, and have been, orally preserved in the provinces which constitute the Laos country, just as they have been handed down from generation to generation, with slight variations in words or incidents. In older times, village elders would tell the stories at their merrymakings around the camp-fires and within their primitive houses, to amuse and instruct the youth and children. However, with the advent of the electronic age, this tradition is being lost, and the more the pity for it.

 

To the Scholar, who is a student of the world's Folk-Lore, you may be assured that you have here a small window in history with the tales of Laos, unobscured, just as they were told when this volume was published in 1899.

 

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