TWO BURMESE FOLKTALES - Two Moral Tales from Burma (Myanmar): Baba Indaba Children's Stories - Issue 84

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 84

 

In Issue 84 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Burmese tale of A SAD FATE - how a poor farm boy is taught to fish by a magical bird. So successful was he that he fed more than just his family. The king hears about his and asks the boy his secret. But did he tell the king the truth? Download and read the story to find out just what the boy said. Lookout for the moral of the story.

The second story is FRIENDS - Four brothers are continually fighting until taught a lesson in unity and strength by their father.


INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
May 2, 2016
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Pages
13
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Adaptations
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 88

 

In Issue 88 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Estonian tale of Tontlawald (Tontla Forest or Tontla Woods.) The story goes thus, a peasant had remarried, and he and his new wife quarreled, and she abused her stepdaughter Elsa. One day, the children were gathering strawberries when a boy realised they had wandered in to Tontlawald; the rest ran off, but Elsa did not think the woods could be worse than her stepmother. She met a little black dog with a silver collar, and a maiden dressed in silk who asked her to stay and be her friend….. Download and read the stories to find out just what happened after that.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 146

 

In this 146th story in the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the Manx fairy tale of Kitty Kerush and her fairy lover Udereek. Udereek comes across Kitty sewing and spinning in her garden and is so enraptured that he returns every day, eventually falling in love with her. So enamoured he can no longer keep his presence and his love a secret and he reveals himself. In time Kitty, too, falls in love with Udereek. But their love for one another is doomed.……. Download and read this story to find out exactly why their love is doomed and what happened when the Fairy King finds out about where and with whom Udereek has been spending his time.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map.

HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through the Middle East and  Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, can be altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

 

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