TWO WELSH TALES - A STRANGE OTTER and MELANGELL'S LAMBS: Baba Indaba Children's Stories - Issue 87

Abela Publishing Ltd
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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 87

 

In Issue 87 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Welsh tales of A STRANGE OTTER and MELANGELL'S LAMBS. Two men chase and catch a red-skinned otter, but all is not what it seems to be. In Melangell’s Lambs, Baba narrates the story of runaway Princess Melangell who ends up in Wales. Download and read the stories to find out just what happened after that.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

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About the author

The Baba Indaba Children's Stories, published by Abela Publishing, often use folklore and fairy tales which have their origins mists of time. Afterall who knows who wrote the story of Cinderella, also known in other cultures as Tattercoats or Conkiajgharuna. So who wrote the original? The answer is simple. No-one knows, or will ever know, so to assume that anyone owns the rights to these stories is nothing but nonsense. As such, we have decided to use the Author name "Anon E. Mouse" which, of course, is a play on the word "Anonymous".

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abela Publishing Ltd
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Published on
May 3, 2016
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Pages
17
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Language
English
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Genres
Comics & Graphic Novels / Manga / Children's Books & Fairy Tales
Fiction / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / Country & Ethnic
Juvenile Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Folklore & Mythology
Young Adult Fiction / Fairy Tales & Folklore / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 88

 

In Issue 88 of the Baba Indaba Children's Stories, Baba Indaba narrates the Estonian tale of Tontlawald (Tontla Forest or Tontla Woods.) The story goes thus, a peasant had remarried, and he and his new wife quarreled, and she abused her stepdaughter Elsa. One day, the children were gathering strawberries when a boy realised they had wandered in to Tontlawald; the rest ran off, but Elsa did not think the woods could be worse than her stepmother. She met a little black dog with a silver collar, and a maiden dressed in silk who asked her to stay and be her friend….. Download and read the stories to find out just what happened after that.

 

INCLUDES LINKS TO 8 FREE STORIES TO DOWNLOADS

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story, on map. HINT - use Google maps.

 

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

 

It is believed that folklore and tales are believed to have originated in India and made their way overland along the Silk and Spice routes and through Central Asia before arriving in Europe. Even so, this does not cover all folklore from all four corners of the world. Indeed folklore, legends and myths from Africa, Australia, Polynesia, and some from Asia too, are altogether quite different and seem to have originated on the whole from separate reservoirs of lore, legend and culture.

What is a Saga? A Saga is a story, or telling in prose, sometimes mixed with verse. There are many kinds of Sagas with varying degrees of truth. There are the mythical Sagas, the historical Sagas of the kings of Norway, and then there are Sagas relating to Iceland narrating the lives, the feuds and the ends of mighty chiefs who dwelt in the districts of the island. These were told by men who lived on the very spot, and told with an exactness as to time and place. The Saga of Njal is one of these. Of all the Sagas relating to Iceland, this tragic story bears away the palm for truthfulness and beauty. To use the words of one well qualified to judge, it is, when compared with all similar compositions, as gold to brass. In this Saga we learn of the sad story of Njal's fate, Gunnar's peerlessness and Hallgerda's infamy, of Bergthora's helpfulness, of Skarphedinn's hastiness, of Flosi's foul deed, and Kari's stern revenge. To tell a story truthfully was what was looked for from all men in those days; but to tell it properly and gracefully, and to clothe the facts in fitting diction, was given to few, and of those few the Saga teller who first threw Njal into its present shape, was one of the first and foremost. As for truthfulness, there are many other Sagas relating to the same period in which the actors in our Saga are mentioned by name and in which their deeds are corroborated. But, of all the Sagas, none were so interesting as Njal, whether as regarding the length of the story, the number of ranking chiefs who appeared in it as actors and the graphic way in which the tragic tale is told.

ISSN: 2397-9607 Issue 339

In this 339th  issue of the Baba Indaba’s Children's Stories series, Baba Indaba narrates the classic Fairy Tale "JACK AND THE BEANSTALK”.

ONCE upon a time, long, long ago and far, far away, there was a poor widow who lived in a little cottage with her only son Jack. Jack was a giddy, thoughtless boy, but very kind-hearted and affectionate.

It had been a long, hard winter, and it didn’t take long for the poor woman to start suffering from fever and ague, which is illnesses involving fever and shivering. As yet, Jack was too young to work, and by degrees the two grew dreadfully poor. The widow saw that there was no means of keeping Jack and herself from starvation but by selling her cow; so one morning she said to her son, "I am too weak to go myself, Jack, so you must take the cow to market for me, and sell her."

Jack readily agreed and that’s when everything began to go from bad to worse!

What happened you ask…? Well many things happened, some silly and some serious and some altogether surprising. To find the answers to these questions, and others you may have, you will have to download and read this story to find out!

 

BUY ANY 4 BABA INDABA CHILDREN’S STORIES FOR ONLY $1

33% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities.

INCLUDES LINKS TO DOWNLOAD 8 FREE STORIES

 

Each issue also has a "WHERE IN THE WORLD - LOOK IT UP" section, where young readers are challenged to look up a place on a map somewhere in the world. The place, town or city is relevant to the story. HINT - use Google maps.

Baba Indaba is a fictitious Zulu storyteller who narrates children's stories from around the world. Baba Indaba translates as "Father of Stories".

These 38 Norwegian folk and fairy tales of elemental mountain, forest and sea spirits, have been handed down through the generations by hinds and huntsmen, woodcutters and fisher-folk, who led hard and lonely lives amid primitive surroundings are, perhaps, among the most fascinating the Scandinavian countries have to offer. Not only are they meant to delight children, and this they do not fail to do. “Grown-ups” who also, who take pleasure in a good story, will enjoy this book as well.
Here you will find stories which are well told. Readers will enjoy the original legend of “Peer Gynt” as it existed before Ibsen gave it more symbolic meaning. You will also find a glowingly, beautiful picture of an Avalon of the Northern seas described in “The Island of Udröst.” And what could be more human and moving than the tragic “The Player on the Jew’s-Harp,” or none more genuinely entertaining than “The King’s Hares”? The thrill and fascination of black magic and mystery run through such stories as “The Secret Church,” “The Comrade,” and “Lucky Andrew.” In “The Honest Four-Shilling Piece” we have the adventures of a Norse Dick Whittington. “Storm Magic” is one of the most thrilling sea tales, bar none, ever written, but every story included in the volume seems to bring with it the breath of the Norse mountains.
One cannot but believe that “The Book of Norwegian Fairy Tales” has an appeal for one and all, since it is a book in which fairy-tales mirror and reflect human yearnings and aspirations, human loves, ambitions and disillusionments, in an imaginatively festooned world. It is the translator’s hope that those who may come to know this book will derive as much pleasure from its reading as it gave him to translate it into English.
 

Table of Contents:

Acknowledgements

Preface

Contents

List Of Illustrations

 

I Per Gynt

II The Isle Of Udröst

III The Three Lemons

IV The Neighbor Underground

V The Secret Church

VI The Comrade

VII Aspenclog

VIII The Troll Wedding

IX The Hat Of The Huldres

X The Child Of Mary

XI Storm Magic

XII The Four-Shilling Piece

XIII The Magic Apples

XIV Self Did It

XV The Master Girl

XVI Anent The Giant Who Did Not Have His Heart

        About Him

XVII The Three Princesses In Whiteland

XVIII Trouble And Care

XIX Kari Woodencoat

XX Ola Storbaekkjen

XXI The Cat Who Could Eat So Much

XXII East Of The Sun And West Of The Moon

XXIII Murmur Goose-Egg

XXIV The Troll-Wife

XXV The King’s Hares

XXVI Helge-Hal In The Blue Hill

XXVII The Lord Of The Hill And John Blessom

XXVIII The Young Fellow And The Devil

XXIX Farther South Than South, And Farther

            North Than North, And In The Great Hill

            Of Gold

XXXX Lucky Andrew

XXXI The Pastor And The Sexton

XXXII The Skipper And Sir Urian

XXXIII The Youth Who Was To Serve Three Years

               Without Pay

XXXIV The Youth Who Wanted To Win The Daughter

               Of The Mother In The Corner

XXXV The Chronicle Of The Pancake

XXXVI Soria-Moria Castle

XXXVII The Player On The Jew’s-Harp

 

The 48  Folk-Tales in this book hail from the South East Asian land-locked country of Laos.

Herein are stories like The Enchanted Mountain, The Spirit-Guarded Cave, The Monkeys and the Crabs, The Origin of Lightning (a tale which seems to be endemic amongst all the world’s cultures,) The Faithful Husband, The Cheating Priest and many more children’s stories which cover Romance and Tragedy, Temples and Priests, Moderation and Greed, Parables and Proverbs and The Wonders of Wisdom. There is also a small collection of Stories which went Astray.

 

When these were first gathered by Katherine Neville Fleeson, the country was a part of the kingdom of Siam, and are uniquely South East Asian in their charm and complete novelty. Until the translator of this volume collected these stories, they were even unwritten, with a single exception which was found in an ancient Laos manuscript. They are, and have been, orally preserved in the provinces which constitute the Laos country, just as they have been handed down from generation to generation, with slight variations in words or incidents. In older times, village elders would tell the stories at their merrymakings around the camp-fires and within their primitive houses, to amuse and instruct the youth and children. However, with the advent of the electronic age, this tradition is being lost, and the more the pity for it.

 

To the Scholar, who is a student of the world's Folk-Lore, you may be assured that you have here a small window in history with the tales of Laos, unobscured, just as they were told when this volume was published in 1899.

 

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