The Fur-Trade Fleet: Shipwrecks of the Hudson’s Bay Company

Heritage House Publishing Co
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In mid-July 1925, the SS Bayeskimo ran into heavy drift ice at the entrance to Hudson Strait. The ice carried her north, squeezing the steamer and testing the strength of her rivets. Helpless until the tide changed and the ice moved, the officers and crew could only watch and listen to the ship’s tormented groans. Slowly at first, trickles of freezing water seeped through the steel plates on her bow. The trickles became a flood, and Bayeskimo began to sink.

Bayeskimo was one of hundreds of ships in the Hudson’s Bay Company’s fur-trade fleet. For much of the company’s history, they roamed Hudson Bay, the subarctic and beyond the Arctic Circle, servicing far-flung posts. Some even battled their way around the tip of South America to open up trade on the west coast of North America. During these arduous voyages, many came to grief under conditions that would test the mettle of any ship. Here are some of their stories.

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About the author

Anthony Dalton is a writer, adventurer and photographer. His expeditions have taken him across the Sahara, through the deserts of the Middle East, through the jungles of Bangladesh and into the Arctic. His adventure and boating-related articles have been published in magazines and newspapers in 20 countries and in nine languages. Anthony is past president of the Canadian Authors Association and is dedicated to the craft of writing. He divides his time between homes in Tsawwassen, BC, and the nearby Gulf Islands.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Heritage House Publishing Co
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Published on
Apr 15, 2011
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Pages
144
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ISBN
9781926936079
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Canada / Pre-Confederation (to 1867)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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