Three Friends...The Perfect Stereotype

Fulton Books, Inc.
Free sample

There are three guys of different cultures who had known each other since the third grade. These guys have been supportive of one another ever since then. If you violate anyone of them, you have violated all of them, and the consequences could be severe. This was loyalty at its best. They were inseparable.

Now in their twenties, the guys have developed some history among themselves. Experiencing tragedy, loss of life, breakups, etc. Being supportive when it was necessary. At this time in their lives, they now have families and responsibilities that are required of them. They all have conflicting schedules, which has not allowed them to see each other as much as they would have liked to. They have not had the opportunity to sit down together to have a cold beer in quite some time. One particular spring day, they found the time. Communicating back and forth with each other, they finally made plans to all meet at one of the other’s house, telling their significant others not to include them in any plans that Friday night. This night was set aside for the trio.

Because of the flexibility of their schedules, two of the three were able to leave work early, and they both agreed to meet up at the local bar before heading to the house. Upon seeing each other, the two of them hugged and gave a stern fist bump. They start a tab, selecting some of the finest liquor that was available at the bar. Hanging out, reminiscing on their high school years. Close to two hours have passed. Both of them decided to pay their tabs and head over to the house. On their way to the house, they stopped at the local convenience store to grab a case of beer, some chips, peanuts, and a few scratch-off lottery tickets. The last of the three would meet them at the house after he got off work and went home to take a shower. It was early in the evening when the two men arrived at the house. It wouldn’t be until late evening when the third guy showed up. When he finally did, it was the usual hugging and fist bumps all over again. This was their home away from home.

By this time, the two men who arrived first had a four-beer head start, and there was some catching up to do. So he goes to the fridge and grabs him a couple of cold ones. The trio enjoyed each other’s company as the evening progressed. Utilizing the valuable time spent, they engage in watching a basketball game on the big screen. There was no one else there except the three. They were exclusive to the outside world. Later, they all were feeling a good buzz from the beer and liquor they consumed throughout the day and night, laughing and enjoying themselves to the fullest. There was a shift of events nonetheless. Something went wrong inside… Very wrong!!
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Additional Information

Publisher
Fulton Books, Inc.
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Published on
Jan 16, 2018
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Pages
120
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ISBN
9781633386341
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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