The Last Chronicle of Barset

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The Last Chronicle of Barset (1867) is the novel that Anthony Trollope considered his masterpiece.
     In the course of the last century and a half, Trollope’s county of Barset has become one of English literature’s most celebrated fictional landscapes. This sixth and final novel in the Barsetshire series revolves around the proud, hardworking, and impecunious Reverend Josiah Crawley, curate of the poor parish of Hogglestock, and his brush with disaster. Crawley stands accused of a theft, but, as he is uncertain himself as to the truth of the matter, he is unable to offer a defense and retreats into self-doubt and shame. The community is bitterly divided between those who wish to help him and those convinced of his guilt, the latter headed by Mrs. Proudie, the bishop’s forceful wife. Meanwhile, Crawley’s daughter Grace has captured the affection of Archdeacon Grantly’s son, Henry, but her father’s scandal stands in the way of their marriage. The solution to the mystery, the downfall of Mrs. Proudie, and the resolution of the fates of many other beloved characters, including Septimus Harding, Johnny Eames, and Lily Dale, bring the famous Barsetshire chronicles to a splendid conclusion. The Last Chronicle of Barset provides a brilliant example of Trollope’s ability to render a highly individual society with such detail and force that it comes to reflect every society, in any age.
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About the author

Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was born in London to a bankrupt barrister father and a mother who, as a well-known writer, supported the family. Trollope enjoyed considerable acclaim both as a novelist and as a senior civil servant in the Post Office. He published more than forty novels and many short stories that are regarded by some as among the greatest of nineteenth-century fiction.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Everyman's Library
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Published on
Nov 16, 2011
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Pages
983
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ISBN
9780307806642
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Literary
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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CHAPTER I

Of course there was a Great House at Allington. How otherwise should there have been a Small House? Our story will, as its name imports, have its closest relations with those who lived in the less dignified domicile of the two; but it will have close relations also with the more dignified, and it may be well that I should, in the first instance, say a few words as to the Great House and its owner.

The squires of Allington had been squires of Allington since squires, such as squires are now, were first known in England. From father to son, and from uncle to nephew, and, in one instance, from second cousin to second cousin, the sceptre had descended in the family of the Dales; and the acres had remained intact, growing in value and not decreasing in number, though guarded by no entail and protected by no wonderful amount of prudence or wisdom. The estate of Dale of Allington had been coterminous with the parish of Allington for some hundreds of years; and though, as I have said, the race of squires had possessed nothing of superhuman discretion, and had perhaps been guided in their walks through life by no very distinct principles, still there had been with them so much of adherence to a sacred law, that no acre of the property had ever been parted from the hands of the existing squire. Some futile attempts had been made to increase the territory, as indeed had been done by Kit Dale, the father of Christopher Dale, who will appear as our squire of Allington when the persons of our drama are introduced. Old Kit Dale, who had married money, had bought outlying farms,--a bit of ground here and a bit there,--talking, as he did so, much of political influence and of the good old Tory cause. But these farms and bits of ground had gone again before our time. To them had been attached no religion. When old Kit had found himself pressed in that matter of the majority of the Nineteenth Dragoons, in which crack regiment his second son made for himself quite a career, he found it easier to sell than to save--seeing that that which he sold was his own and not the patrimony of the Dales. At his death the remainder of these purchases had gone. Family arrangements required completion, and Christopher Dale required ready money. The outlying farms flew away, as such new purchases had flown before; but the old patrimony of the Dales remained untouched, as it had ever remained.

 

The enduring love story and satirical comedy by a master of the English novel.

A young vicar’s ambition drives him into a costly bargain in this classic tale from one of the Victorian era’s finest novelists. Set in rural England in the fictitious county of Barsetshire, the fourth novel in the Chronicles of Barsetshire brilliantly examines the intersection of romance and social class.
 
Mark Robarts is a young, ambitious vicar from the village of Framley, who is living off a benefice provided by Lady Lufton, the mother of his childhood friend, Ludovic. When Robarts decides to try his hand at advancing his wealth and social standing by seeking connections and business opportunities among the county’s upper crust, he is pressured into providing a loan to Mr. Sowerby, a member of Parliament and notorious debtor.
 
All the while, Ludovic, Lord Lufton, pursues Robarts’s sister Lucy, despite objections from Lady Lufton, who urges her son to enter into courtship with a girl better suited to his title and social class. As debt collectors look to inventory Robarts’s possessions—and as Lucy vows to avoid Lord Lufton if she cannot receive his mother’s blessing—the stage is set for a hilarious and unforgettable climax.
 
Comparing, Framley Parsonage to the other novels in the Chronicles of Barsetshire, its author noted, “There was much Church, but more love-making.” Filled with realistic detail and delightful turns of phrase, Framley Parsonage is a testament to Anthony Trollope’s unique ability to combine high-minded insight with popular appeal.
 
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