The International Sweethearts of Rhythm: The Ladies' Jazz Band from Piney Woods Country Life School

Scarecrow Press
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The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, a popular women's jazz band of the 1940s, has earned a reputation as the 'best all-women's swing band ever to perform.' This revised and updated edition provides fascinating reading for jazz enthusiasts and students of American history, music, and women's history. It is the most comprehensive and objective history of the band to date. Handy documents all sides of the band's controversial story and interviews members of the band. She updates the careers of band members who remained in the music business. Accompanied by an extensive bibliography and many photographs.
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About the author

D. Antoinette Handy is a former flutist, music educator, and arts administrator. She was a humanities Fellow at the University of North Carolina and Duke University. She recently retired as Director of the Music Program, National Endowment for the Arts. Her previous Scarecrow Press books are Black Women in American Bands and Orchestras and Black Conductors.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Scarecrow Press
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Published on
Oct 1, 1998
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9781461623595
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / 20th Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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