The After Party: A Novel

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"A vintage version of 'Gossip Girl' meets bigger hair." The Skimm

"DiSclafani’s story sparkles like the jumbo diamonds her characters wear to one-up each other. Historical fiction lovers will linger over every lush detail." —People

One of the Best New Books for Summer 2016 – Good Housekeeping

One of the 3 Beach Reads You Won’t Be Able to Put Down – O Magazine 

From the bestselling author of The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls comes a story of lifelong female friendship – in all its intimate agony and joy – set within a world of wealth, beauty, and expectation. 

Joan Fortier is the epitome of Texas glamour and the center of the 1950s Houston social scene. Tall, blonde, beautiful, and strong, she dominates the room and the gossip columns. Every man wants her; every woman wants to be her. Devoted to Joan since childhood, Cece Buchanan is either her chaperone or her partner in crime, depending on whom you ask. But when Joan’s radical behavior escalates the summer they are twenty-five, Cece considers it her responsibility to bring her back to the fold, ultimately forcing one provocative choice to appear the only one there is. 
 
A thrilling glimpse into the sphere of the rich and beautiful at a memorable moment in history, The After Party unfurls a story of friendship as obsessive, euphoric, consuming, and complicated as any romance.
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About the author

Anton DiSclafani is the author of the nationally bestselling novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls. She was raised in northern Florida.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Reviews

3.4
191 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
May 17, 2016
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9780698161238
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Coming of Age
Fiction / Contemporary Women
Fiction / Family Life
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Anton DiSclafani
“This summer’s first romantic page turner.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

Named a most anticipated book for Summer 2013 by The Wall Street Journaland Publishers Weekly and USA Today, NPR, and People summer reads pick

From the author of The After Party, a lush, sexy, evocative debut novel of family secrets and girls’-school rituals, set in the 1930s South.


It is 1930, the midst of the Great Depression. After her mysterious role in a family tragedy, passionate, strong-willed Thea Atwell, age fifteen, has been cast out of her Florida home, exiled to an equestrienne boarding school for Southern debutantes. High in the Blue Ridge Mountains, with its complex social strata ordered by money, beauty, and girls’ friendships, the Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a far remove from the free-roaming, dreamlike childhood Thea shared with her twin brother on their family’s citrus farm—a world now partially shattered. As Thea grapples with her responsibility for the events of the past year that led her here, she finds herself enmeshed in a new order, one that will change her sense of what is possible for herself, her family, her country.

Weaving provocatively between home and school, the narrative powerfully unfurls the true story behind Thea’s expulsion from her family, but it isn’t long before the mystery of her past is rivaled by the question of how it will shape her future. Part scandalous love story, part heartbreaking family drama, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is an immersive, transporting page-turner—a vivid, propulsive novel about sex, love, family, money, class, home, and horses, all set against the ominous threat of the Depression—and the major debut of an important new writer.
Elizabeth Strout
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE • A simple hospital visit becomes a portal to the tender relationship between mother and daughter in this extraordinary novel by the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Olive Kitteridge and The Burgess Boys.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The Washington Post • The New York Times Book Review • NPR • BookPage • LibraryReads • Minneapolis Star Tribune • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Look for Elizabeth Strout’s highly anticipated new work of fiction, Anything Is Possible, which is available for pre-order now.

Lucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn’t spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy’s childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lie the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy’s life: her escape from her troubled family, her desire to become a writer, her marriage, her love for her two daughters. Knitting this powerful narrative together is the brilliant storytelling voice of Lucy herself: keenly observant, deeply human, and truly unforgettable.

Praise for My Name Is Lucy Barton

“There is not a scintilla of sentimentality in this exquisite novel. Instead, in its careful words and vibrating silences, My Name Is Lucy Barton offers us a rare wealth of emotion, from darkest suffering to—‘I was so happy. Oh, I was happy’—simple joy.”—Claire Messud, The New York Times Book Review

“Spectacular . . . Smart and cagey in every way. It is both a book of withholdings and a book of great openness and wisdom. . . . [Strout] is in supreme and magnificent command of this novel at all times.”—Lily King, The Washington Post
 
“A short novel about love, particularly the complicated love between mothers and daughters, but also simpler, more sudden bonds . . . It evokes these connections in a style so spare, so pure and so profound the book almost seems to be a kind of scripture or sutra, if a very down-to-earth and unpretentious one.”—Marion Winik, Newsday
 
“Potent with distilled emotion. Without a hint of self-pity, Strout captures the ache of loneliness we all feel sometimes.”—Time

“An aching, illuminating look at mother-daughter devotion.”—People

“A quiet, sublimely merciful contemporary novel about love, yearning, and resilience in a family damaged beyond words.”—The Boston Globe

“Sensitive, deceptively simple . . . It is Lucy’s gentle honesty, complex relationship with her husband, and nuanced response to her mother’s shortcomings that make this novel so subtly powerful. . . . [It’s] more complex than it first appears, and all the more emotionally persuasive for it.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“Strout maps the complex terrain of human relationships by focusing on that which is often unspoken and only implied. . . . A powerful addition to Strout’s body of work.”—The Seattle Times

“[Strout] reminds us of the power of our stories—and our ability to transcend our troubled narratives.”—Miami Herald

“Magnificent.”—Ann Patchett
Elin Hilderbrand


Three romantic rivals. One crowded house. Plenty of room for jealousy.

Laurel Thorpe, Belinda Rowe, and Scarlett Oliver share only two things; a love for the man they all married, Deacon Thorpe--a celebrity chef with an insatiable appetite for life--and a passionate dislike of one another. All three are remarkable, spirited women, but they couldn't be more different. Laurel: Deacon's high school sweetheart and an effortlessly beautiful social worker; Belinda: a high-maintenance Hollywood diva; and Scarlett: a sexy southern belle floating by on her family money and her fabulous looks. They've established a delicate understanding over the years--they avoid each other at all costs.

But their fragile detente threatens to come crashing down after Deacon's tragic death on his favorite place on earth: a ramshackle Nantucket summer cottage. Deacon's final wish was for his makeshift family to assemble on his beloved Nantucket to say good-bye. Begrudgingly, Laurel, Belinda, and Scarlett gather on the island as once again, as in each of their marriages, they're left to pick up Deacon's mess. Now they're trapped in the crowded cottage where they all made their own memories--a house that they now share in more ways than one--along with the children they raised with Deacon, and his best friend. Laurel, Belinda, and Scarlett each had an unbreakable bond with Deacon--and they all have secrets to hide.

Before the weekend is over, there are enough accusations, lies, tears, and drama to turn even the best of friends--let alone three women who married the same man--into adversaries. As his unlikely family says good-bye to the man who brought them together--for better or worse--will they be able to put aside their differences long enough to raise a glass in Deacon's honor?
Curtis Sittenfeld
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Wonderfully tender and hilariously funny, Eligible tackles gender, class, courtship, and family as Curtis Sittenfeld reaffirms herself as one of the most dazzling authors writing today.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR AND THE TIMES (UK)

This version of the Bennet family—and Mr. Darcy—is one that you have and haven’t met before: Liz is a magazine writer in her late thirties who, like her yoga instructor older sister, Jane, lives in New York City. When their father has a health scare, they return to their childhood home in Cincinnati to help—and discover that the sprawling Tudor they grew up in is crumbling and the family is in disarray.

Youngest sisters Kitty and Lydia are too busy with their CrossFit workouts and Paleo diets to get jobs. Mary, the middle sister, is earning her third online master’s degree and barely leaves her room, except for those mysterious Tuesday-night outings she won’t discuss. And Mrs. Bennet has one thing on her mind: how to marry off her daughters, especially as Jane’s fortieth birthday fast approaches.

Enter Chip Bingley, a handsome new-in-town doctor who recently appeared on the juggernaut reality TV dating show Eligible. At a Fourth of July barbecue, Chip takes an immediate interest in Jane, but Chip’s friend neurosurgeon Fitzwilliam Darcy reveals himself to Liz to be much less charming. . . .

And yet, first impressions can be deceiving.

Praise for Eligible

“Even the most ardent Austenite will soon find herself seduced.”—O: The Oprah Magazine

“Blissful . . . Sittenfeld modernizes the classic in such a stylish, witty way you’d guess even Jane Austen would be pleased.”—People (book of the week)

“[A] sparkling, fresh contemporary retelling.”—Entertainment Weekly

“[Sittenfeld] is the ideal modern-day reinterpreter. Her special skill lies not just in her clear, clean writing, but in her general amusement about the world, her arch, pithy, dropped-mike observations about behavior, character and motivation. She can spot hypocrisy, cant, self-contradiction and absurdity ten miles away. She’s the one you want to leave the party with, so she can explain what really happened. . . . Not since Clueless, which transported Emma to Beverly Hills, has Austen been so delightedly interpreted. . . . Sittenfeld writes so well—her sentences are so good and her story so satisfying. . . . As a reader, let me just say: Three cheers for Curtis Sittenfeld and her astute, sharp and ebullient anthropological interest in the human condition.”—Sarah Lyall, The New York Times Book Review

“A clever, uproarious evolution of Austen’s story.”—The Denver Post

“If there exists a more perfect pairing than Curtis Sittenfeld and Jane Austen, we dare you to find it. . . . Sittenfeld makes an already irresistible story even more beguiling and charming.”—Elle

“A playful, wickedly smart retelling of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.”—BuzzFeed

“Sittenfeld is an obvious choice to re-create Jane Austen’s comedy of manners. [She] is a master at dissecting social norms to reveal the truths of human nature underneath.”—The Millions

“A hugely entertaining and surprisingly unpredictable book, bursting with wit and charm.”—The Irish Times

“An unputdownable retelling of the beloved classic.”—PopSugar
Riverhead Books
Riverhead Books is proud to present our Summer 2013 Insider which gives readers more information about the stories behind—or sometimes from within—our Summer 2013 list.
 
Included in the Riverhead Books Summer 2013 Insider are:

A Q&A with Khaled Hosseini, author of And the Mountains Echoed, an unforgettable novel about finding a lost piece of yourself in someone else.
 An interview with Pransky, the layabout mutt turned therapy dog at the heart of Sue Halpern’s A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher.
 Ramona Ausubel’s essay, “Transformation,” about the inspiration for A Guide to Being Born, her enthralling new collection that uses the world of the imagination to explore the heart of the human condition.
 “The Story in the Mountains,” an essay by Anton DiSclafani about writing her debut novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, a lush, sexy evocative story of family secrets and girls’-school rituals set in the 1930s South.
 “Looking through the Looking Glass,” an essay by Anna Badkhen on how she came to write The World is a Carpet, her unforgettable portrait of a place and people shaped by centuries of art, trade and war.
 A note from Mark Kurlansky about “Dancing in the Street,” the iconic song he uses as a lens to examine the story of the civil rights movement’s genesis in his new book, Ready for a Brand New Beat
 Matthew Berry’s essay, “It’s Fantasy Sports World, You Just Live in It,” about the growing world of fantasy sports and how it has shaped his career and personal life which he details in his new book, Fantasy Life.
 “Noodles of the Silk Road,” a field guide by Jen Lin-Liu, author of On the Noodle Road, in which she immerses herself in a moveable feast of foods and cultures and discovers some surprising truths about commitment, independence, and love
 A brief history of the historic raid on Harper’s Ferry which plays a key role in James McBride’s new novel, The Good Lord Bird, the story of a young boy born a slave who joins John Brown’s antislavery crusade—and who must pass as a girl to survive.
 Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s essay, “Memories of the Years of Chaos,” about how Colombia’s recent history informs his new novel, The Sound of Things Falling

Each of these pieces is an engaging and informative introduction to these truly wonderful books.
 

Anton DiSclafani
Las buenas amigas no solo es una disección tan excitante como memorable de los círculos en que se mueven los ricos, bellos y famosos, sino la historia de una amistad tan obsesiva, apasionada y devoradora como una historia de amor.

Joan Fortier es el paradigma del glamour tejano y el centro de la escena social del Houston de los años cincuenta. Alta, rubia, bella y enérgica, destaca en los salones y su nombre está en boca de todos.

Los hombres la desean y las mujeres quieren ser ella, pero ese mundo opulento, con sus clubes de campo y sus bailes de presentación en sociedad, tiene reglas estrictas. El dinero fluye tan libremente como el petróleo, pero la libertad y el poder son patrimonio de los hombres.

¿Qué sucede cuando una mujer de apetitos y deseos indecorosos como Joan quiere más?

Cece Buchanan, amiga de Joan desde la infancia, vive pendiente de ella, alternando entre la crítica y la complicidad. Cuando la conducta de Joan se radicaliza, Cece se ve enfrentada a difíciles decisiones.

Opiniones:
«DiSclafani es una maestra a la hora de crear suspense y de revelar mundos privados mediante detalles inesperados y elocuentes.»
The New York Times

«Las buenas amigas resplandece como los enormes diamantes que lucen sus personajes.»
People

«Las buenas amigas explora el deseo femenino que amenaza el statu quo.»
The Washington Post

«Un poco de Mad Men, un poco de Carol y mucho erotismo.»
Tampa Bay Times

«La historia nos sumerge en una época y un lugar deslumbrantes y algo decadentes.»
The Houston Chronicle

«Esta excitante lectura se disfruta con la misma facilidad que un daiquiri.»
Cosmopolitan

«Dos mujeres que se enfrentan a la sociedad tejana de los años cincuenta, y todo el glamour y los escándalos que las acompañan.»
Boston Magazine

«Una historia sobre la vida, el amor y la amistad en una sociedad opulenta.»
Houston Press

«DiSclafani pinta un rico retrato de una sociedad cerrada en sí misma y sus decadentes miembros en una narración absorbente.»
Kirkus Reviews

Anton DiSclafani
“This summer’s first romantic page turner.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

Named a most anticipated book for Summer 2013 by The Wall Street Journaland Publishers Weekly and USA Today, NPR, and People summer reads pick

From the author of The After Party, a lush, sexy, evocative debut novel of family secrets and girls’-school rituals, set in the 1930s South.


It is 1930, the midst of the Great Depression. After her mysterious role in a family tragedy, passionate, strong-willed Thea Atwell, age fifteen, has been cast out of her Florida home, exiled to an equestrienne boarding school for Southern debutantes. High in the Blue Ridge Mountains, with its complex social strata ordered by money, beauty, and girls’ friendships, the Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is a far remove from the free-roaming, dreamlike childhood Thea shared with her twin brother on their family’s citrus farm—a world now partially shattered. As Thea grapples with her responsibility for the events of the past year that led her here, she finds herself enmeshed in a new order, one that will change her sense of what is possible for herself, her family, her country.

Weaving provocatively between home and school, the narrative powerfully unfurls the true story behind Thea’s expulsion from her family, but it isn’t long before the mystery of her past is rivaled by the question of how it will shape her future. Part scandalous love story, part heartbreaking family drama, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls is an immersive, transporting page-turner—a vivid, propulsive novel about sex, love, family, money, class, home, and horses, all set against the ominous threat of the Depression—and the major debut of an important new writer.
Riverhead Books
Riverhead Books is proud to present our Summer 2013 Insider which gives readers more information about the stories behind—or sometimes from within—our Summer 2013 list.
 
Included in the Riverhead Books Summer 2013 Insider are:

A Q&A with Khaled Hosseini, author of And the Mountains Echoed, an unforgettable novel about finding a lost piece of yourself in someone else.
 An interview with Pransky, the layabout mutt turned therapy dog at the heart of Sue Halpern’s A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher.
 Ramona Ausubel’s essay, “Transformation,” about the inspiration for A Guide to Being Born, her enthralling new collection that uses the world of the imagination to explore the heart of the human condition.
 “The Story in the Mountains,” an essay by Anton DiSclafani about writing her debut novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, a lush, sexy evocative story of family secrets and girls’-school rituals set in the 1930s South.
 “Looking through the Looking Glass,” an essay by Anna Badkhen on how she came to write The World is a Carpet, her unforgettable portrait of a place and people shaped by centuries of art, trade and war.
 A note from Mark Kurlansky about “Dancing in the Street,” the iconic song he uses as a lens to examine the story of the civil rights movement’s genesis in his new book, Ready for a Brand New Beat
 Matthew Berry’s essay, “It’s Fantasy Sports World, You Just Live in It,” about the growing world of fantasy sports and how it has shaped his career and personal life which he details in his new book, Fantasy Life.
 “Noodles of the Silk Road,” a field guide by Jen Lin-Liu, author of On the Noodle Road, in which she immerses herself in a moveable feast of foods and cultures and discovers some surprising truths about commitment, independence, and love
 A brief history of the historic raid on Harper’s Ferry which plays a key role in James McBride’s new novel, The Good Lord Bird, the story of a young boy born a slave who joins John Brown’s antislavery crusade—and who must pass as a girl to survive.
 Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s essay, “Memories of the Years of Chaos,” about how Colombia’s recent history informs his new novel, The Sound of Things Falling

Each of these pieces is an engaging and informative introduction to these truly wonderful books.
 

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